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Entries from February 28th, 2013

Dangerous Adirondack Spider

February 28th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack Life

Iron Spider hangs from steel-web,
ready to bite with 1000 hornets.

Iron Spider

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Governor Cuomo Recognizes Forest Rangers Involved in Plane Crash Rescue Last Week

February 27th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today recognized the nine Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Forest Rangers and the dispatcher involved in the rescue of three men whose plane crashed in the Adirondack Mountains last week. Governor Cuomo commended the men and woman for their heroic efforts to save the lives of the survivors in sub-zero temperatures.

Big Burn Mountain, near Lake Placid

“The actions of these Forest Rangers exemplify the unwavering dedication and tireless commitment of the men and women charged with keeping New Yorkers and those who visit our state safe,” Governor Cuomo said. “These Forest Rangers saved lives and should be commended for their bravery and service to New York State.”

Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens said, “Last week’s rescue of three plane crash survivors is just the latest example of how vital our Forest Rangers are when a crisis strikes. They are specially trained and they are special men and women. I’m very proud of the heroism and dedication of our Forest Rangers.”

The Forest Rangers, all based out of DEC’s Region 5 office in Ray Brook, recognized by Governor Cuomo are:

  • Forest Ranger Lt. Charles Platt, nearly 20 years as a Forest Ranger
  • Forest Ranger Kevin Burns, 14 years of service as a Forest Ranger
  • Forest Ranger Peter Evans, 14 years of service as a Forest Ranger
  • Forest Ranger James Giglinto, 17 years of service as a Forest Ranger
  • Forest Ranger Thomas Gliddi, 16 years of service as a Forest Ranger
  • Forest Ranger Chris Kostoss, 14 years of service as a Forest Ranger
  • Forest Ranger Joseph LaPierre, 14 years of service as a Forest Ranger
  • Forest Ranger David Russell, 8 years of service as a Forest Ranger
  • Forest Ranger Scott VanLaer, 16 years of service as a Forest Ranger
  • Dispatcher Alicia Bodmer, 16 years as a Dispatcher

Information on the rescue

At 6:32 p.m. DEC Dispatch in Ray Brook was contacted by State Police seeking Forest Ranger response to a plane crash in a wooded area near the Lake Placid Airport. Temperatures were in the single digits and fell to sub-zero overnight.

Essex County 911 was in contact with the three male occupants of the airplane all of Westfield, NJ who indicated they were in good condition. They provided coordinates of the crash site which were relayed to DEC Dispatch. When the coordinates were plotted on a map the site of the plane crash was near the summit of Nye Mountain, a trail-less High Peak just west of the Adirondack Loj.

Two DEC Forest Rangers initially responded to the Mount Jo Trailhead on the Adirondack Loj road and headed to the crash site on snowshoes and carrying cold weather gear for the crash victims. A second team of four Forest Rangers started a short while later carrying equipment for evacuating the three men.

A helicopter from the State Police Aviation Unit was also dispatched from the Lake Clear Airport but at 7:35 pm advised that they were unable to reach the crash site due to weather and darkness.

A Forest Ranger was in direct phone contact with the men at the crash site. They reported they had erected a tarp as a temporary shelter and put on extra clothing to attempt to stay warm.

At 10:50 pm Forest Rangers concluded that Nye Mountain location was not the correct location. At about this same time the first two Forest Rangers had hiked three miles to the crash site and confirmed there was no airplane present. Ranger determined the original coordinates were provided in atypical format. Plotting the coordinates in the standard format, Rangers determined the crash site was actually just west of Lake Placid near Big Burn Mountain.

The second group of forest rangers was redirected from Nye Mountain to Big Burn Mountain where they were joined by a another ranger. The Forest Rangers were able to reach the crash site by snowmobile via the Jack Rabbit Trail and bushwhacking on snowshoes the last half mile. The crash site was one mile from the road. The three men were located by the Forest Rangers at 1:55 a.m. The men were evacuated by snowmobile to the Whiteface Inn Road Trailhead where they were evaluated by the Lake Placid Rescue Squad. It was determined the men were fine and they declined any further medical treatment or transport.

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DEC to Use Helicopter for Transporting Lime to Remote Adirondack Lake

February 13th, 2013 · 1 Comment · Adirondack News

Effort Will Counteract Effects of Acid Rain and Facilitate the Return of Brook Trout to Lyon Lake

NYSDEC LogoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will begin to deliver 80 tons of lime to an acidified lake in the Five Ponds Wilderness Area north of Stillwater Reservoir in the town of Webb, Herkimer County today, DEC Regional Director Judy Drabicki announced.

State police helicopters and their crews will be among the 40 plus staff required to complete this liming operation. From a staging area at Stillwater Reservoir on the ice near the boat launch site, sling loads of 2,000 pounds of lime will be hauled by helicopter for 3.8 miles into Lyon Lake. The lime will be left on the lake and helicopter will return to Stillwater for the next load. This trip will be repeated 80 times over four days, weather cooperating, to get all the lime out to Lyon Lake where DEC staff spreads it across the lake’s frozen surfaces.

Lyon Lake, Webb, Herkimer, NY

“This is largest liming operation DEC ever embarked on, an effort involving months of planning and coordination with DEC staff, Forest Rangers and the critical state police helicopters and pilots and crews,” Director Drabicki said. “Adding lime to the lake will allow brook trout to once again live in this waterbody. This is just the latest effort by Governor Cuomo and DEC to expand opportunities for the fishing and hunting community.”

When the lake thaws in the spring, the lime will combine with lake water and make the water less acid. This will be the first lime treatment for Lyon Lake. DEC plans to stock the lake with native Adirondack brook trout during this fall’s aerial stocking.

DEC has great hopes for reestablishment of brook trout in some larger Adirondack ponds and lakes. Fisheries staff has noted that the larger water bodies maintain a deep cold water layer right through the summer (referred to as stratification), unlike the smaller ponds which now mix right through the summer. This results in warmer water temperatures in these smaller ponds that are not as suitable for brook trout.

Anyone looking for additional information on DEC’s liming program or a list of Adirondack trout ponds can call the Watertown fisheries office at
(315) 785-2263.

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Whiteface’s Hoyt’s High Open

February 6th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Whiteface - Lake PlacidWILMINGTON, N.Y. — The Hoyt’s High Trail on Whiteface Mountain, in Wilmington, N.Y., opened for the first time this skiing and riding season today, Tuesday, Feb. 5. Cut in 2008 and named in honor of Whiteface veteran ski patroller Jim Hoyt Sr., the 4,700 foot long expert trail had always relied on Mother Nature to cover its 1,400 feet of vertical. This autumn, crews installed 9,000 feet of piping allowing for top to bottom snowmaking.

Skiers and riders now have an expert trail that will allow them to get back to the Lookout Mountain lift. In the past, Lookout Below was the only expert trail that allowed skiers and riders immediate access to the triple chair lift.

While at Whiteface, flip, twist and jump like a pro onto the Whiteface air bag. Available Wednesdays through Sundays, Whiteface’s US AIRBAG™ is the perfect tool to help you improve your freestyle/freeride skills. This 50′ x 50′ pillow of air has several inflatable chambers specially designed to ensure a soft smooth landing time and time again. A single jump is $5 while an all-day pass is $15. A waiver is required.

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Maple sweetness at The Wild Center and Paul Smith’s College VIC

February 5th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Events scheduled for February and March

PAUL SMITHS, NY – The recent cold temperatures bode well for a good maple syrup season – and in February and March, The Wild Center and the Paul Smith’s College VIC will host several events showcasing how to make (and enjoy!) this quintessential springtime treat.

Over four weekends, watch how the sweet sap of trees becomes the highlight of a pancake breakfast and learn other ways to use this natural sweetener at a series of demonstrations, activities and events in both Tupper Lake and Paul Smiths.

Northern New York Maple Project

The Paul Smith’s College VIC will host two workshops for people interested in establishing their own backyard maple sugaring operations.

  • Toss out your old-fashioned maple taps – on Saturday, Feb. 16, from 1-4 p.m., learn how to set up a modern tubing system with Mike Farrell, director of the Cornell Maple Program. A brief classroom session will be followed by hands-on work at the VIC’s sugar maple demonstration site. Topics will include preparing the sugar bush prior to tubing installation; site considerations; line placement and installation; tapping trees; sanitation; and sap collection. Please dress for the weather and be prepared for a 2-3 mile snowshoe walk on groomed trails and uneven terrain. Bring your own snowshoes or borrow a pair from the VIC.
  • On Saturday, March 23, from 1-4 p.m., learn about the art of maple sugaring with special emphasis on backyard tapping, collection and boiling. At this event, part of New York State’s Maple Weekend, Paul Smith’s College students will lead workshops and provide tours of the sugarhouse and the maple demonstration site. Includes program and tastings for the whole family.

The Wild Center will also host a pair of workshops on Sunday, Feb. 24, and Saturday, March 16, to launch Tupper Lake’s first-ever community maple sugaring project. The project, one of the first in the state, invites area residents to tap maple trees in their own yards. The Wild Center will collect the sap daily once it starts to flow, ultimately boiling it down into maple syrup.

To participate, attend the free “Art of Maple Sugaring Breakfast and Workshop.” Registered participants will get a pancake breakfast, an introduction to the natural history of maple trees, expert instruction and tapping tools. Additional supplies will be available for purchase from The Wild Supply Company. Advanced registration is required; attendance at either workshop is necessary to participate in the project. Families are encouraged to attend.

After the workshops end, it’s all maple all day at The Wild Center, with maple stories, crafts and tastings on Feb. 24 and March 16. The Adirondack Museum will share local maple sugaring stories through historical objects and pictures from the past. Get insight into the sugaring process from experienced naturalists at 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. as they discuss tapping trees, processing sap, and – the sweet part – maple sugar. Take a closer look at an operational evaporator, catch some running sap and drill your own tap as we explore the local maple-sugaring story.

All events are free and open to the public. Registration is required. Visit Maple Weekends to register for events at The Wild Center or call (518) 359-7800. For events at the Paul Smith’s College VIC, contact Brian McDonnell at (518) 327-6241 or bmcdonnell@paulsmiths.edu. For more information, please visit us online at www.northernnewyorkmaple.com.

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Presidents Week at The Wild Center

February 5th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Wild Center LogoTupper Lake, NY – Don’t miss Presidents Week at The Wild Center, February 17th – February 24th as we celebrate the season with a week of wintery Adirondack fun. Everyday there is a new winter theme and activities for the whole family to enjoy. In addition to special daily winter programming there will be guided snowshoe walks, live animal encounters, and warm winter beverages. For more information, visit The WILD Center – Events.

Saturday, February 16th
Join us for opening day of Winter Week as we celebrate winter in the Adirondacks! Get outside and try your hand at snowshoeing with one of our naturalists. Or stay inside to learn about winter adventuring and to meet some of our Adirondack animals, whose adaptations allow them to cope with the harsh Adirondack winters in intriguing ways.

Sunday, February 17th
Noon theater program and 2:00 pm walk
Animal Tracking with Vince Walsh

Join Vince Walsh for a day on animal tracking and signs to learn how you can see, identify and interpret the natural world of the Adirondacks. Vince will share his experience and insight through multiple public programs starting with a 12:00 pm theater presentation on winter and its influences on animal behavior. Then bring your tracking questions, pictures and stories to Vince as he puzzles over your tracking experiences and discoveries. Don’t forget to bring some warm clothes so at 2:00 pm you can head outside to practice your tracking skills and use all your senses to see what evidence of animals you can find in the Adirondack forest. Snowshoes will be provided free with admission.

Monday, February 18th – 1:00 pm
Wild about Winter

Join naturalist and entertainer Rob Carr for a wild theater program about Adirondack animals in the winter. Filled with stories, humor, puppets and LOTS of live animals, it is guaranteed to please visitors of all ages.

Tuesday, February 19th – 1:00 pm
Winter Birds of the Adirondacks

Where have all the birdies gone? While it might seem like all our birds fly south when the weather gets chilly, there are plenty that stick around and tough out the Adirondack winters. Meet LIVE Adirondack birds in our theater at 1:00 pm for a fascinating program about birds and their winter adaptations. Follow up with a 2:00 pm bird walk along our trails, looking for signs of these tenacious feathered fliers and talking about the ways different species adapt for the cold.

Wednesday, February 20th – 1:00 pm
Creatures of the Night

Nighttime animals love the long winter nights. Join us in Planet Adirondack at 1:00 pm to meet live creatures of the night and get a glimpse into their nighttime habits.

Thursday, February 21st – 1:00 pm
Putting the Myth on Ice

Bears sleep all winter, plants stop growing and all birds fly south…or do they? Join naturalist Andrea Schwander for a fun-filled theater program of breaking down misconceptions and myth busting. The program will focus on some animal and winter myths, and will feature audience participation, demonstrations, and of course, some of The Wild Center’s live animals.

Friday, February 22nd – 1:00 pm
Brrrrrrrrreakfast

Not many choose to brave the cold Adirondack winters, not even in the animal kingdom. Lucky for us we have a couple of LIVE animals that tend to stick around instead of hightailing it to warmer areas. Come to our afternoon theater program to learn about their adaptations for obtaining food and energy in the long cold days of winter.

Saturday, February 23rd – 1:00 pm
The Travel Troupe

Join The Wild Center in welcoming the Ronathahonni Cultural Center’s Travel Troupe. Come learn about their cultural history through song, dance and storytelling at 1:00 pm in our Flammer Theater.

Sunday, February 24th – 9:00 am
Pancake Breakfast and Sugaring Workshop

The Wild Center is joining Tupper Lake community members and their sugar maple trees to create a community-driven Maple Sugar house. For local residents: register for the 9:00 am free Pancake Breakfast and Sugaring Workshop to learn more about our community maple project. Register at www.wildcenter.org/events and see how you can get involved.

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