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Entries Tagged as 'bike'

Bike Vacation

June 27th, 2016 · No Comments · News

Parque natural del Barranco del Río Dulce
Parque natural del Barranco del Río Dulce

Elapsed Time Moving Time Distance Average Speed Max Speed Elevation Gain
05:23:27 04:18:36 42.63 9.89 31.76 3,436.68
hours hours mi. mph mph ft.

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Adirondack Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Highlights: 8/3 – 8/9/15

August 12th, 2015 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

“DEC Forest Rangers’ knowledge of first aid, land navigation and technical rescue techniques are often critical to the success of their missions,” said Acting DEC Commissioner Marc Gerstman. “Search and rescue missions often require Rangers to function in remote wilderness areas from rugged mountainous peaks to white-water rivers, and through vast forest areas from spruce-fir thicket to open hardwoods.”


Recent missions carried out by DEC Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks include:

Essex County
Town of Jay
Lost Biker: On August 9, 2015 at 5:02 p.m., Essex County 911 transferred a call to DEC Ray Brook Dispatch from a 42-year-old male biker from St. Basile Le Grande, Quebec, lost and injured somewhere off Jay Mountain Road in the Jay Mountain Wilderness. Two DEC Forest Rangers responded to the Seventy Mountain area of the Jay Mountain Wilderness. DEC Dispatch advised the biker to shout so he could be located. Forest Rangers located him at 7:05 p.m. He reported he was biking in Elizabethtown with his brother whose bike had a mechanical failure. The man planned to bike back to the private campground in Wilmington where they were staying so that he could return with a car, but the GPS directions he followed got him lost. Forest Rangers transported the man back to the campground in Wilmington at 8:30 p.m.

Franklin County
Town of Franklin – Taylor Pond Wild Forest/Easement Lands
Lost kayaker: On August 9, 2015 at 7:44 a.m., DEC Central Dispatch received a call reporting a 40-year-old male kayaker from Ballston Spa, NY, became lost while paddling on Union Falls Pond. The female caller reported that she received a text from the kayaker at 6:30 p.m. on August 8, indicating he was lost. At 9:30 p.m. she received a second text from the man saying he was on Franklin Falls Flow where he planned to spend the night as he did not have a flashlight or map. She called for help after not receiving any further communication. Four DEC Forest Rangers, a DEC Assistant Forest Ranger, a DEC Backcountry Steward and New York State Police began a search but could not find the kayaker after an extensive search of the waterway and woods along the shore. At 11:56 a.m. the kayaker called Franklin County 911 and they obtained coordinates for his location. Searchers followed those coordinates and located the kayaker at 12:17 p.m. on the east shore of Union Falls Pond. Forest Rangers evaluated his health before transporting him by boat back to his vehicle at 1 p.m.

Hamilton County
Town of Indian Lake – West Canada Lakes Wilderness
Overdue hikers: On August 9, 2015 at 12:30 a.m., DEC Central Dispatch received a call reporting a 26-year-old man and 24-year-old woman from West Islip, NY, were one day overdue while hiking in the West Canada Lakes. Three DEC Forest Rangers responded and located the pair’s vehicle at the Pillsbury Mountain Trailhead. The Rangers searched the trails leading from the trailhead and eventually located the pair in good condition near Sampson Lake. The hikers reported that while hiking on the Northville Placid Trail on the first day they mistakenly turned off onto the West Canada Lakes Trail toward the Moose River Plains. They encountered another hiker who advised them they were heading in the wrong direction, so they turned around and hiked back to Brook Trout Lake where they spent the night. They continued hiking on the second day and made it to Sampson Lake where they spent a second night. The Forest Rangers escorted them back to the trailhead, arriving at their vehicle at 9:00 a.m.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry. Visit DEC’s Hiking Safety and Adirondack Trail Information webpages for more information.

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Bicycle Tourism is the Best

July 10th, 2015 · No Comments · Miscellania

Pinar de Sigüenza

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Adirondack Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Highlights 6/10- 6/13/15

June 16th, 2015 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

“DEC Forest Rangers’ knowledge of first aid, land navigation and technical rescue techniques are often critical to the success of their missions,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens. “Search and rescue missions often require Rangers to function in remote wilderness areas from rugged mountainous peaks to white-water rivers, and through vast forest areas from spruce-fir thicket to open hardwoods.”


Recent missions carried out by DEC Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks include:

Essex County
McKenzie Mountain Wilderness – Town of Wilmington

Distressed hiker: On June 10, 2015 at 4:15 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from a 37-year-old man from Hollywood, FL saying that he and his dog had become exhausted and could not continue to the summit of Whiteface Mountain. Ray Brook Dispatch advised him to call 911 to obtain his GPS coordinates. A DEC Forest Ranger responded with an ATV to the Connery Pond Trail and continued to Whiteface Landing where he talked to the man by phone. The Ranger met up with the hiker just south of the Whiteface lean-to and provided him with food and water before assisting him back to Whiteface Landing. The Forest Ranger then gave the man and his dog a ride back to the trailhead by ATV. The incident concluded at 8:00 p.m.

Hamilton County
Moose River Plains Wild Forest – Town of Indian Lake

Injured cyclists: On June 13, 2015 DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received reports of two bicycle accidents on Moose River Plains Road during the Adirondack Black Fly Challenge Bicycle Race. The first accident, which happened at 1:50 p.m., involved a 60-year-old man from Delmar, NY who was participating in the race. A DEC Forest Ranger responded and provided basic first aid until the Indian Lake EMS arrived on scene. Indian Lake EMS transported the man to a local medical facility. At 2:05 p.m., a 60-year-old male participant from New Hartford also crashed on Moose River Plains Road. A DEC Forest Ranger responded and provided basic first aid until the Inlet EMS arrived on scene and transported to the injured man to a local medical facility.

Washington County
Lake George Wild Forest – Town of Fort Ann

Distressed hiker: On June 11, 2105 at 3:47 p.m., Warren County 911 contacted DEC Ray Brook Dispatch reporting a 23-year-old woman from Wilton in medical distress on Buck Mountain. The hiking party was approximately 2 ½ miles from the Pilot Knob trailhead. Four DEC Forest Rangers responded along with the Pilot Knob and North Queensbury Fire Departments and EMS. Forest Rangers reached the woman at 4:50 p.m. Due to her health condition, New York State Police Aviation responded and transported her to the North Queensbury Fire Department at 6:30 p.m. From there, an ambulance transported her to Glens Falls Hospital.

Lake George Wild Forest – Town of Fort Ann

Injured emergency responders: On June 11, 2015 at 7:00 p.m., an ATV overturned on the Buck Mountain trail injuring two members of the North Queensbury Fire Department. The department members; a 75-year-old man from Boydton, VA and a 64-year-old man from Lake George, had been assisting in an earlier rescue. A carryout was necessary due to the extent of one of the injuries. DEC Forest Rangers and Fire Department members carried the more injured man to the trailhead and Lake George EMS transported him to Glens Falls Hospital at 9:25 p.m. The other man walked out on his own.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry. Visit DEC’s Hiking Safety and Adirondack Trail Information webpages for more information.

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DEC Seeks to Amend Moose River Plains Management Plan to Improve Mountain Bike Trail System

December 4th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Public Meeting Scheduled for December 18 in Raquette Lake

NYSDEC LogoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is seeking comments to amend the Moose River Plains Wild Forest (MRPWF) Unit Management Plan to improve its mountain bike trail system, Regional Director Robert Stegemann announced today.


“The 2011 Unit Management Plan called for DEC to create a working group consisting of mountain bikers, local governments and other interested parties to develop a comprehensive mountain bike plan for Moose River Plains,” said Director Stegemann. “A meeting of stakeholders in July 2013 resulted in DEC contracting with the International Mountain Bicycling Association to create a mountain bike trail system concept plan. The concept plan has been completed.”

The next step in the process to develop a high-quality mountain bike trail system in the Moose River Plains Wild Forest is to consider an amendment to the UMP.

DEC is initiating a public review to determine which elements of the concept plan to adopt in a UMP amendment, which will also define how a mountain bike trail system will be implemented on the ground. A public meeting will be held in the gymnasium of the Raquette Lake Union Free School, 115 State Route 28, Raquette Lake, on Thursday, December 18, beginning at 7 p.m. The school is wheelchair accessible. Please provide any requests for specific accommodation in advance to DEC at 518-897-1248.

DEC staff will provide a brief presentation on the proposals in the concept plan, identifying the proposals that may be acted on without amending the UMP; proposals that require a UMP amendment; and proposals that cannot be undertaken due to physical or regulatory restrictions. DEC will then seek thoughts and ideas from the public on the proposals in the plan.

Mountain Biking in the AdirondacksMountain biking has become a very popular activity in many places. Residents and local government officials in the communities around the Moose River Plains seek to improve their local economies by developing high-quality mountain bike trail systems to attracting mountain bikers to the area.

Comments may also be provided by January 30, 2015 in writing to McCrea Burnham, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY, 12233-4254 or e-mailed to: Adirondackpark@dec.ny.gov.

The Moose River Plains UMP and the mountain bike trail system conceptual plan can be viewed and downloaded at:
Moose River Plains Wild Forest – Unit Management Plan

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DEC Seeks to Amend Wilmington Wild Forest Management Plan

October 29th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Public Meeting Scheduled for Wednesday November 12 at Whiteface Mountain Ski Center

NYSDEC LogoWilmington Wild Forest Unit Management Plan (UMP) is under review for a possible amendment to identify improvement and expansion of trails within the unit, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Regional Director Robert Stegemann announced today.

“We are responding to requests from local government and other organizations to provide additional trails in the Wilmington Wild Forest,” said Director Stegemann. “DEC continues to work to ensure that the forest preserve lands we manage are an asset to Adirondack communities, while continuing to protect and conserve the natural resources of those lands.”


A public meeting will be held at the Base Lodge at the Whiteface Mountain Ski Center, 5021 Route 86 in Wilmington on Wednesday, November 12 beginning at 6 pm. DEC staff will provide a brief presentation on the current trail system after which the public is asked to share information and ideas regarding improvements and expansion of the trail system. The lodge is wheelchair accessible. Please provide any requests for specific accommodation in advance to DEC at 518-897-1248.

DEC has partnered with local governments and volunteers to build a number of trails and trail systems since the UMP was approved in October 2005. Currently, there are approximately 33 miles of trails with 23 miles open to mountain bikes and eight miles of snowmobile trails – including a connection to the Adirondack/North Country snowmobile trail network.

Mountain biking has become a very popular activity in the Wilmington Wild Forest with bike trail systems concentrated around the Wilmington Flume and Hardy Road. Visitor comments have indicated that there is a need for improvements to the trail system in the unit. Improvements mentioned include the need for trail connections with the hamlet area, more trails that would be considered less difficult, and the relocation of some trail segments to better protect natural resources.

The Wilmington Wild Forest is located in the towns of Wilmington and Keene in Essex County and the town of Black Brook in Clinton County. The unit covers about 14,000 acres across several detached Forest Preserve parcels. The core area is located on the east-facing slopes of Whiteface Mountain between the Whiteface Mountain Ski center and the Whiteface Veterans’ Memorial Highway.

Comments may also be provided in writing to Steve Guglielmi, Senior Forester, P.O. Box 296, Ray Brook, NY 12977 or by e-mail to r5ump@gw.dec.state.ny.us. The current Wilmington Wild Forest UMP can be found at http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/22585.html.

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DEC And DOT Announce Plans To Reinvigorate The Remsen To Lake Placid Travel Corridor

July 10th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

State Agencies Seek Public Input on Possible Unit Management Plan Amendment to Convert the Tupper Lake to Lake Placid Segment to a Recreational Trail

State Agencies Will Also Explore Options to Bolster Rail Service Along Remainder of the Corridor and to Create and Expand Snowmobile Routes to Connect Communities between Old Forge and Tupper Lake

The State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Transportation (DOT) today announced that they will reopen the 1996 Unit Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement (1996 UMP/EIS) for the Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor. The review will evaluate use of the Tupper Lake to Lake Placid segment for a recreational trail. It will also examine opportunities to maintain and realize the full economic potential of rail service on the remainder of the corridor. In addition, the state will review options to create and expand alternative snowmobile corridors to connect communities from Old Forge to Tupper Lake on existing state lands and conservation easements.

The UMP governs the use of the 119-mile Remsen to Lake Placid Travel Corridor. The determination to revisit the UMP was made following a thorough assessment of options and a review of the extensive public comments made during four public meetings held by DEC and DOT last year.

DEC and DOT will prepare the UMP and draft EIS, which will explore opportunities to increase recreational use of the rail corridor and ensure it promotes tourism and economic growth in the surrounding communities. As part of this process, the public will have an opportunity to review and comment on a draft scope that outlines significant issues and environmental impacts, and guides preparation of the UMP and draft EIS. In addition, the public will be able to review and comment on the draft UMP and draft EIS when they are deemed complete.

Revisiting the 1996 UMP/EIS will enable DEC and DOT to thoroughly review those aspects of the 1996 UMP/EIS that recommend enhanced recreational opportunities and community connections, and to examine alternatives for the best future use of the Corridor along the Tupper Lake to Lake Placid segment. DEC and DOT will work with the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) and public stakeholders, including local officials and residents, to assess alternatives that reflect current realities along the corridor and potential environmental and economic impacts.

“Our goal is to protect our natural resources, while also exploring ways to increase opportunities for people to enjoy outdoor recreation activities in the Adirondacks,” DEC Commissioner Martens said. “We recognize that the future of the Remsen to Lake Placid Travel Corridor is important to local residents, communities and the regional economy, and the UMP process is the appropriate way to determine the best use of the corridor. We greatly appreciate the input received and continue to encourage the public and stakeholders to be actively involved in the UMP process since their views and interests will be an important part of the decision-making process.”

“The Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor is a tremendous transportation resource that traverses stunning landscapes across the northern Adirondacks,” DOT Commissioner Joan McDonald said. “In response to public interest, we are reopening the Unit Management Plan, providing new opportunities to engage local communities and support the regional economy as we plan for the corridor’s future.”

The UMP process will provide a transparent and public means of exploring a proposed amendment to the 1996 UMP/EIS that would maximize benefits from public use of the corridor and conform with the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan. Any proposed amendment would consider and incorporate public comments.

The rail service envisioned by the 1996 UMP/EIS has never been fully realized. The recurring short term lease under which the Adirondack Scenic Railroad operates has hindered the capital investment necessary to improve the rail line in the most remote sections of the corridor. This review will evaluate options to provide the long-term assurance to the rail operator and its investors need to move forward with much needed improvements.

Snowmobilers have long used the travel corridor during peak season to transit between communities. That use is made unsafe during periods of lesser snow as track becomes exposed. As part of this review, DEC will evaluate ways to expand snowmobile routes between the communities along the Old Forge to Tupper Lake segment of the corridor on state lands and conservation easements. This will open new recreational and tourism opportunities for those communities but also provide a safer riding experience for the snowmobiling community.

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