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Entries Tagged as 'events'

DEC to Prepare Management Plan for Northern Franklin County State Forests

December 3rd, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Public Meeting Scheduled for December 17 in Malone

NYSDEC LogoThe state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will develop a unit management plan for 21,239 acres of public lands in the Northern Franklin County State Forests, DEC Region 5 Director Robert Stegemann announced today.

The Northern Franklin State Forest includes five state forests (St. Regis River, Deer River, Titusville Mountain, Valley View and Trout River), seven detached forest preserve parcels, a state fish hatchery and over 50 miles of public fishing rights. The lands are located in the towns of Bangor, Bellmont, Brandon, Chateaugay, Constable, Dickinson, Malone, Moira and Westville.

“DEC is seeking public input on how to best manage these lands and provide access for outdoor recreational activities including hunting, fishing, trapping, hiking, camping, wildlife watching and other activities,” said Director Stegemann.

A public meeting will be held at the North County Community College Campus, Resheketina Hall, Room RH-208 at 75 Williams St. in Malone on Wednesday, December 17, beginning at 6 p.m. The facility is wheelchair accessible. Please provide any requests for specific accommodation in advance to DEC at 518-897-1248.

The meeting will provide an opportunity for the public to meet with DEC staff and share thoughts, ideas and suggestions regarding management of State lands within this particular unit. This will be the first of several opportunities for the public to be involved in the planning process.

Natural features in the Northern Franklin Unit include the St. Regis River, Deer River, Salmon River, Trout River and Chateaugay River; Titusville Mountain, Mount Immortelle and Elephant’s Head; and Huckleberry Marsh. The primary recreational uses are hunting and fishing, hiking, camping, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling and bird and wildlife watching. The trails to Elephant’s Head and High Falls on Titusville Mountain State Forest and the campsites on Deer River State Forest are used often by the public.

Management issues under consideration by DEC’s planning team include public recreational access, habitat management, and forest management and forest products sales. Upon completion of a thorough resource inventory, an analysis of current and potential uses, and review of public comments, the Northern Franklin planning team will prepare a draft UMP. The public will have the opportunity to review and comment on the draft UMP.

Proposed management actions will be guided by DEC’s Strategic Plan for State Forest Management which focuses on ecosystem health and diversity, economic benefits, recreational opportunities, forest conservation and sustainable management. The completed draft plan will be widely distributed for public review and comment and a public meeting will be scheduled to discuss the draft.

Any interested individual or organization wanting to submit comments may contact Forester Ethan Pierce by mail at NYSDEC, P.O. Box 296, Ray Brook, NY 12977; by telephone at 518-897-1291; or by e-mail at R5.UMP@dec.ny.gov.

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Environmental Org Warns ‘Snirt’ ATV Rally Has Grown Too Big

April 11th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

April 12 Event Now Draws 3,600 All-Terrain Vehicles to Tug Hill’s Lewis County Trails & Roads, Leaves Lasting Scar on Landscape & Rivers

Adirondack CouncilLOWVILLE, N.Y. – The Adirondack Park’s largest environmental organization has called on the Lewis County Board of Legislators to reconsider its prediction that an annual all-terrain vehicle (ATV) rally causes no environmental harm.

The Adirondack Council wants Lewis County officials to conduct a full environmental impact study of the annual SNIRT (Snow/Dirt) Rally, which allows ATV riders from across the Northeast to use public highways and the county’s trails to travel between local taverns.

The event causes erosion, excessive noise and disturbances to fish and wildlife, while destroying vegetation, intrudes on quiet neighborhoods and imperils human lives, the Adirondack Council said. Any one of these is reason enough to require a full environmental review under state law, the organization warned.

The SNIRT event drew only a few hundred participants when it began 11 years ago. In recent years, however, more than 3,500 riders have participated. The event’s impact has expanded from Tug Hill into the Adirondack Park, near Brantingham Lake, at the edge of the Independence River Wild Forest.

“We are extremely disappointed that the board of legislators has decided to operate an all-terrain vehicle rally without implementing the necessary changes that would minimize the environmental damage this event has caused in the past,” said Adirondack Council Legislative Director Kevin Chlad in an April 8 letter to the board.

“SNIRT’s rapid and uncontrolled expansion has overwhelmed the capacity of law en forcement, leading to an epidemic of trespassing on both state and private lands. Such lawlessness should be unacceptable to the county’s lawmakers,” Chlad wrote. “Further, we find it troubling that you continue to allow this event on public highways within the Adirondack Park.”

Chlad noted that that operation of ATVs on public highways is illegal, unless roads are properly opened.

“We believe that Lewis County has violated the provisions of section 2405 of the Vehicle and Traffic Law,” which limits the roads that may be opened to ATV traffic to only short distances, and onlywhere they can connect two already-legal ATV-riding areas or trails. Instead, the county opens roads that connect only to other roads.

Chlad said the county appears to be mistakenly relying upon another section of the V&TL (section 2408) to justify its road openings, when that section is merely a set of instructions for how to notify the public of special events.

“The Adirondack Council continues to recommend that a formal State Environmental Quality Review be conducted so that officials may monitor the full extent of damage that the event inflicts, both on the region’s roads and its natural resources,” Chlad advised.

Chlad said the organization strongly disagreed with the county’s finding that the annual event has so little impact on the environment that there is no need for a formal environmental impact study. He reminded county officials that the NY State Environmental Quality Review Act requires a formal environmental review of any proposed event that would cause one of the following to environmental changes:

  • Substantial adverse change in noise levels;
  • Substantial increase in soil erosion;
  • Destruction of large quantities of vegetation;
  • Substantial interference with the movement of fish or wildlife;
  • Impairment of aesthetic resources of community or neighborhood character; or,
  • Creation of a hazard to human health.

Over the past five years, the SNIRT Rally has caused all six of these impacts, Chlad said.

He noted that most of them can be witnessed on Youtube.com videos posted by the event’s participants.

“The Adirondack Council believes that this overdue assessment is a reasonable and necessary step towards improving this event in the future, as it would allow for proper environmental safeguards to be put in place,” he wrote. “We understand and support the county’s desire to boost tourism. However, we strongly believe that state law calls for events such as this to be carefully planned and strictly supervised to prevent the widespread abuses of public and private property that have been left in the wake of every previous SNIRT event.

“A lack of attention to these details encourages a culture of wanton environmental destruction, and at worst, simultaneously promotes drinking and driving with reckless disregard for public and private property and the well-being of other riders,” he noted.

In 2013, dozens of SNIRT participants had to be rescued by local rescue and law enforcement officials when they left the highways that had been opened to them and trespassed into local farm fields, where they were stranded by deep snows. Lewis County still has a significant snowpack as this weekend’s event approaches.

The Adirondack Council is privately funded, not-for-profit organization whose mission is to ensure the ecological integrity and wild character of New York’s six-million-acre Adirondack Park. The Council envisions an Adirondack Park comprised of core wilderness areas, surrounded by working forests and farms, and vibrant rural communities. The Council carries out its mission and vision through research, education, advocacy and legal action. Adirondack Council members live in all 50 United States.

VIDEO:

Recent video of SNIRT Rally: Note that multi-passenger vehicles with roofs are too large to be legally registered as ATVs in NY State. Note also the constant presence of alcohol in these videos, as well as the riders leaving the roads and trails to cross wetlands and farm fields, both of which are supposed to be off-limits to all riders.

ATV RIDE! OVER 3500 BIKES! SNIRT RUN 2012 BARNS CORNERS NY

Snirt Run 2012 (Whiskey Riders)

SNIRT RUN 2013 POLARIS POWER! PLAYING IN THE MUD AND WATER!

2013 Snirt Run

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DEC to Hold Three Weekends of Santanoni Winter Open Houses

January 13th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Rare Opportunity to See the Inside of Camp Buildings During the Winter Months

NYSDEC LogoBuilding upon the popularity of the previous two years’ Camp Santanoni Winter Weekend events, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will once again open this historic property to the public for recreational opportunities, DEC Commissioner Joe Martens announced today.

The events will take place during the Martin Luther King holiday weekend, January 18-20; President’s Day holiday weekend, February 15-17; and the weekend of March 16-17. Cross-country skiers and snowshoers will have access to the historic camp properties located in the town of Newcomb in Essex County to rest and view interpretative displays.

“As in the past two years, visitors will be able to enjoy winter outdoor recreation with their family and friends while immersed in the beautiful wilderness setting and the rich cultural heritage of the Adirondacks,” Commissioner Martens said. “Events like these are part of Governor Cuomo and DEC’s efforts to work with local communities to increase tourism and economic activity by showcasing this wondrous part of New York State. The increasing popularity of the Winter Weekends demonstrates our efforts are effective in bringing visitors to the North Country.”

Camp Santanoni
(Panoramio – Photo of Camp Santanoni)

A 9.8-mile round trip cross-country ski or snowshoe excursion traverses from Camp Santanoni’s Gate House complex to the remote lakeside main lodge complex. The trip provides a moderate physical activity and a great opportunity to enjoy the outdoors.

This year’s Winter Weekend events, the third year the events have been held, are expected to continue the trend of being more successful than the previous year. In 2012, more than 250 visitors enjoyed themselves at one of the three weekend events. Last year more than 350 visitors came to enjoy winter outdoor recreation with their family and friends. Those attending were amazed by the wilderness surroundings while being immersed in the rich cultural history of the Adirondacks.

During the three Winter Weekend events cross-country skiers and snowshoers will be able to visit both the Gate Lodge and Main Lodge of Camp Santanoni, view displays about the great camp and take interpretive tours with Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) staff. The Artist’s Studio, a stone building near the main lodge on the shores of Newcomb Lake, will be open as a warming hut. Coffee, tea and hot chocolate will be available and the public is asked to bring their own cups. Also, the Adirondack Interpretive Center will provide snowshoes to lend to visitors at the Gate Lodge.

The three Winter Weekend events are being hosted by DEC, AARCH, the town of Newcomb and SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry’s (ESF) Adirondack Interpretive Center.

“We are happy to work with our partners, DEC, AARCH and SUNY ESF to build on the history and natural beauty of our town to provide tourism destinations that people want to visit,” said Newcomb Town Supervisor George Canon. “Great Camp Santanoni is at least as beautiful covered in winter snows as it is in mid-summer.”

In addition to the popular 9.8-mile round trip from the Gate Lodge to the Main Lodge, cross-country skiers and snowshoers are encouraged to take the half mile-trail that connects Camp Santanoni to the nearby Adirondack Interpretive Center’s 3.6-mile trail system. The Center’s buildings will be open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on all three days of the Winter Weekends in January and February and on the Saturday and Sunday of the March Winter Weekend.

“ESF is excited to partner with DEC, town of Newcomb and AARCH to help expand how Great Camp Santanoni is used,” said Paul Hai of SUNY ESF’s Northern Forest Institute, which manages the Adirondack Interpretive Center. “Newcomb is a fantastic town, rich with history, recreation and educational opportunities. Collaborations like this grow our town while increasing visitors’ and residents’ appreciation and understanding of the Adirondacks. We are looking forward to working together on more programs and creative ideas in Newcomb.”

While people may visit Camp Santanoni 365 days a year, the buildings are not typically open to the public during the winter months. Additional open house weekends may be considered based on the popularity and success of these three weekend events.

“We are delighted to be part of these winter open house weekends again and look forward to welcoming skiers and snowshoers there at a very beautiful and peaceful time of year,” said Steven Engelhart, Executive Director of AARCH. “Last year, over eight days, we had more than 300 people make the ten mile round-trip outing into Santanoni and we thoroughly enjoyed providing a place to warm up and interpreting the camp’s rich history and architecture to them.”

Construction of Camp Santanoni began in 1892 by Robert and Anna Pruyn and eventually consisted of more than four dozen buildings on 12,900 acres including a working farm, the Gate Lodge complex, and a huge rustic Main Lodge and other buildings situated on Newcomb Lake. Camp Santanoni was in private ownership until 1972. Over the last several decades of state ownership, the camp has gradually been restored through a partnership between DEC, AARCH and the town of Newcomb. Santanoni is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a National Historic Landmark. Camp Santanoni is considered by many to be the classic Adirondack Great Camp.

Reservations are not required. Contact AARCH at 518-834-9328 for more information on the winter weekends. More information about Camp Santanoni, the Adirondack Interpretive Center and the Newcomb area may be found at:

Camp Santanoni Historic Area – NYSDEC
Adirondack Architectural Heritage
Adirondack Interpretive Center
Town of Newcomb

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11th Annual Great Adirondack Birding Celebration

April 22nd, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Paul Smith’s College VIC 31 May – 2 June 2013

Adirondack Bird WatchingThe 11th annual Great Adirondack Birding Celebration is scheduled for 31 May – 2 June 2013, at the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) in Paul Smiths, New York. The event will feature field trips to boreal birding hot spots, informative lectures, and workshops. Field trips include: an all-day Birding Across the Adirondacks trip on Friday, plus a selection of half-day field trips on Saturday and Sunday (Birding by Ear at the VIC, Beginner Birder Workshop at the VIC, Bloomingdale Bog, Intervale Lowlands, Little Clear Pond for loons, Madawaska Flow, Spring Pond Bog, and Whiteface Mountain).

The keynote speaker on Friday night is Sara R. Morris, professor of Biology and the Program Coordinator of the Environmental Science Program at Canisius College. Dr. Morris will speak on bird migration. The keynote speaker on Saturday night is Michale Glennon, Coordinator for the Adirondack Program at the Wildlife Conservation Society. Dr. Glennon will speak on the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Boreal Bird Project.

Some of the boreal species that participants in the Great Adirondack Birding Celebration hope to find include the Black-backed Woodpecker, American Three-toed Woodpecker, Boreal Chickadee, Spruce Grouse, Bicknell’s Thrush and a variety of migrating warblers.

The 3,000-acre Paul Smiths VIC contains every habitat type found in the Adirondack Park with the exception of alpine vegetation. Included on the property is a 60-acre marsh, five ponds, several brooks and swamps, bogs, fens, and varied forest types, most notably northern boreal forest. The site includes significant glacial and geological features and provides scenic vistas of Saint Regis Mountain and Jenkins Mountain. The VIC property includes 6 miles of interpretive trails and 8 miles of back country trails for spring, summer, and fall use.

Festival Hours:

Friday, 31 May: 9:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday, 1 June: 6:00 AM to 8:30 PM
Sunday, 2 June: 6:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Preregistration is required. Registration opens 1 May 2013.

For more information: http://bit.ly/17IyIiL

(Photo: Courtesy of ARTC)

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Maple sweetness at The Wild Center and Paul Smith’s College VIC

February 5th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Events scheduled for February and March

PAUL SMITHS, NY – The recent cold temperatures bode well for a good maple syrup season – and in February and March, The Wild Center and the Paul Smith’s College VIC will host several events showcasing how to make (and enjoy!) this quintessential springtime treat.

Over four weekends, watch how the sweet sap of trees becomes the highlight of a pancake breakfast and learn other ways to use this natural sweetener at a series of demonstrations, activities and events in both Tupper Lake and Paul Smiths.

Northern New York Maple Project

The Paul Smith’s College VIC will host two workshops for people interested in establishing their own backyard maple sugaring operations.

  • Toss out your old-fashioned maple taps – on Saturday, Feb. 16, from 1-4 p.m., learn how to set up a modern tubing system with Mike Farrell, director of the Cornell Maple Program. A brief classroom session will be followed by hands-on work at the VIC’s sugar maple demonstration site. Topics will include preparing the sugar bush prior to tubing installation; site considerations; line placement and installation; tapping trees; sanitation; and sap collection. Please dress for the weather and be prepared for a 2-3 mile snowshoe walk on groomed trails and uneven terrain. Bring your own snowshoes or borrow a pair from the VIC.
  • On Saturday, March 23, from 1-4 p.m., learn about the art of maple sugaring with special emphasis on backyard tapping, collection and boiling. At this event, part of New York State’s Maple Weekend, Paul Smith’s College students will lead workshops and provide tours of the sugarhouse and the maple demonstration site. Includes program and tastings for the whole family.

The Wild Center will also host a pair of workshops on Sunday, Feb. 24, and Saturday, March 16, to launch Tupper Lake’s first-ever community maple sugaring project. The project, one of the first in the state, invites area residents to tap maple trees in their own yards. The Wild Center will collect the sap daily once it starts to flow, ultimately boiling it down into maple syrup.

To participate, attend the free “Art of Maple Sugaring Breakfast and Workshop.” Registered participants will get a pancake breakfast, an introduction to the natural history of maple trees, expert instruction and tapping tools. Additional supplies will be available for purchase from The Wild Supply Company. Advanced registration is required; attendance at either workshop is necessary to participate in the project. Families are encouraged to attend.

After the workshops end, it’s all maple all day at The Wild Center, with maple stories, crafts and tastings on Feb. 24 and March 16. The Adirondack Museum will share local maple sugaring stories through historical objects and pictures from the past. Get insight into the sugaring process from experienced naturalists at 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. as they discuss tapping trees, processing sap, and – the sweet part – maple sugar. Take a closer look at an operational evaporator, catch some running sap and drill your own tap as we explore the local maple-sugaring story.

All events are free and open to the public. Registration is required. Visit Maple Weekends to register for events at The Wild Center or call (518) 359-7800. For events at the Paul Smith’s College VIC, contact Brian McDonnell at (518) 327-6241 or bmcdonnell@paulsmiths.edu. For more information, please visit us online at www.northernnewyorkmaple.com.

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Presidents Week at The Wild Center

February 5th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Wild Center LogoTupper Lake, NY – Don’t miss Presidents Week at The Wild Center, February 17th – February 24th as we celebrate the season with a week of wintery Adirondack fun. Everyday there is a new winter theme and activities for the whole family to enjoy. In addition to special daily winter programming there will be guided snowshoe walks, live animal encounters, and warm winter beverages. For more information, visit The WILD Center – Events.

Saturday, February 16th
Join us for opening day of Winter Week as we celebrate winter in the Adirondacks! Get outside and try your hand at snowshoeing with one of our naturalists. Or stay inside to learn about winter adventuring and to meet some of our Adirondack animals, whose adaptations allow them to cope with the harsh Adirondack winters in intriguing ways.

Sunday, February 17th
Noon theater program and 2:00 pm walk
Animal Tracking with Vince Walsh

Join Vince Walsh for a day on animal tracking and signs to learn how you can see, identify and interpret the natural world of the Adirondacks. Vince will share his experience and insight through multiple public programs starting with a 12:00 pm theater presentation on winter and its influences on animal behavior. Then bring your tracking questions, pictures and stories to Vince as he puzzles over your tracking experiences and discoveries. Don’t forget to bring some warm clothes so at 2:00 pm you can head outside to practice your tracking skills and use all your senses to see what evidence of animals you can find in the Adirondack forest. Snowshoes will be provided free with admission.

Monday, February 18th – 1:00 pm
Wild about Winter

Join naturalist and entertainer Rob Carr for a wild theater program about Adirondack animals in the winter. Filled with stories, humor, puppets and LOTS of live animals, it is guaranteed to please visitors of all ages.

Tuesday, February 19th – 1:00 pm
Winter Birds of the Adirondacks

Where have all the birdies gone? While it might seem like all our birds fly south when the weather gets chilly, there are plenty that stick around and tough out the Adirondack winters. Meet LIVE Adirondack birds in our theater at 1:00 pm for a fascinating program about birds and their winter adaptations. Follow up with a 2:00 pm bird walk along our trails, looking for signs of these tenacious feathered fliers and talking about the ways different species adapt for the cold.

Wednesday, February 20th – 1:00 pm
Creatures of the Night

Nighttime animals love the long winter nights. Join us in Planet Adirondack at 1:00 pm to meet live creatures of the night and get a glimpse into their nighttime habits.

Thursday, February 21st – 1:00 pm
Putting the Myth on Ice

Bears sleep all winter, plants stop growing and all birds fly south…or do they? Join naturalist Andrea Schwander for a fun-filled theater program of breaking down misconceptions and myth busting. The program will focus on some animal and winter myths, and will feature audience participation, demonstrations, and of course, some of The Wild Center’s live animals.

Friday, February 22nd – 1:00 pm
Brrrrrrrrreakfast

Not many choose to brave the cold Adirondack winters, not even in the animal kingdom. Lucky for us we have a couple of LIVE animals that tend to stick around instead of hightailing it to warmer areas. Come to our afternoon theater program to learn about their adaptations for obtaining food and energy in the long cold days of winter.

Saturday, February 23rd – 1:00 pm
The Travel Troupe

Join The Wild Center in welcoming the Ronathahonni Cultural Center’s Travel Troupe. Come learn about their cultural history through song, dance and storytelling at 1:00 pm in our Flammer Theater.

Sunday, February 24th – 9:00 am
Pancake Breakfast and Sugaring Workshop

The Wild Center is joining Tupper Lake community members and their sugar maple trees to create a community-driven Maple Sugar house. For local residents: register for the 9:00 am free Pancake Breakfast and Sugaring Workshop to learn more about our community maple project. Register at www.wildcenter.org/events and see how you can get involved.

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DEC To Again Hold Three Weekends of Santanoni Winter Open Houses

January 15th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Events Will Provide a Rare Opportunity to See the Inside of Camp Buildings During the Winter Months

NYSDEC LogoThree Winter Weekend events will once again be held at Camp Santanoni this year, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens announced today.

The events will take place during the Martin Luther King holiday weekend, January 19-21; President’s Day holiday weekend, February 16-18; and the weekend of March 16-17. Cross-country skiers and snowshoers will have access to the historic camp properties located in the town of Newcomb in Essex County to rest and view interpretative displays.

Camp Santanoni
(Panoramio – Photo of Camp Santanoni)

“Camp Santanoni provides an amazing 9.8-mile round trip cross-country ski excursion in the Adirondacks,” Commissioner Martens said. “The trail traverses from the Gate House complex to the remote lakeside main lodge complex, providing a moderate ski and a great opportunity to enjoy the outdoors. Events like these are part of Governor Cuomo and DEC’s efforts to work with local communities to increase tourism and economic activity by showcasing the recreational opportunities and historic treasures the Adirondacks has to offer.”

During the three Winter Weekend events cross-country skiers and snowshoers will be able to visit both the Gate Lodge and Main Lodge of Camp Santanoni, view displays about the great camp and take interpretive tours with Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) staff. The Artist’s Studio, a stone building near the main lodge on the shores of Newcomb Lake, will be open as a warming hut. Coffee, tea and hot chocolate will be available and the public is asked to bring their own cups. Also, the Adirondack Interpretive Center will provide snowshoes to lend to visitors at the Gate Lodge.

The three Winter Weekend events are being hosted by DEC, AARCH, the town of Newcomb and SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry’s (ESF) Adirondack Interpretive Center.

“We are happy to work with our partners, DEC, AARCH and SUNY ESF to build on the history and natural beauty of our town to provide tourism destinations that people want to visit,” said Newcomb Town Supervisor George Canon. “Great Camp Santanoni is at least as beautiful covered in winter snows as it is in mid-summer.”

“ESF is excited to partner with DEC, town of Newcomb and AARCH to help expand how Great Camp Santanoni is used,” said Paul Hai of SUNY ESF’s Northern Forest Institute, which manages the Adirondack Interpretive Center. “Newcomb is a fantastic town, rich with history, recreation and educational opportunities. Collaborations like this grow our town while increasing visitors’ and residents’ appreciation and understanding of the Adirondacks. We are looking forward to working together on more programs and creative ideas in Newcomb.”

“We are delighted to be part of these winter open house weekends again and look forward to welcoming skiers and snowshoers there at a very beautiful and peaceful time of year,” said Steven Engelhart, Executive Director of AARCH. “Last year, over eight days, we had more than 400 people make the ten mile round-trip outing into Santanoni and we thoroughly enjoyed providing a place to warm up and interpreting the camp’s rich history and architecture to them.”

In addition to the popular 9.8-mile round trip from the Gate Lodge to the Main Lodge, cross-country skiers and snowshoers are encouraged to take the half mile-trail that connects Camp Santanoni to the nearby Adirondack Interpretive Center’s 3.6-mile trail system. The Center’s buildings will be open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on all three days of the Winter Weekends in January and February and on the Saturday and Sunday of the March Winter Weekend.

While people may visit Camp Santanoni 365 days a year, the buildings are not typically open to the public during the winter months. Additional open house weekends may be considered based on the popularity and success of these three weekend events.

Construction of Camp Santanoni began in 1892 by Robert and Anna Pruyn and eventually consisted of more than four dozen buildings on 12,900 acres including a working farm, the Gate Lodge complex, and a huge rustic Main Lodge and other buildings situated on Newcomb Lake. Camp Santanoni was in private ownership until 1972. Over the last several decades of state ownership, the camp has gradually been restored through a partnership between DEC, AARCH and the town of Newcomb. Santanoni is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a National Historic Landmark. Camp Santanoni is considered by many to be the classic Adirondack Great Camp.

Reservations are not required but for more information, contact AARCH at (518) 834-9328. More information about Camp Santanoni, the Adirondack Interpretive Center and the Newcomb area may be found at:

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