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Entries Tagged as 'fire'

Conflagration on Couch St

September 20th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Fire on Couch St – Plattsburgh NY 9/20/13

Concern for fire victims generates generosity
Woman rescued from fire, severely burned
Firefighters pull woman from burning building

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Backcountry Information for Labor Day Weekend

August 30th, 2012 · No Comments · News

NYSDEC LogoIf you are planning to recreate in the Adirondacks this Labor Day weekend, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation asks you to please remember the following:

HIGH USAGE LEVELS: Visitors to the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness and other popular areas of the Adirondacks should be aware that trailhead parking lots and interior campsites will often fill to capacity on Labor Day weekend. Please plan accordingly and seek backcountry recreation opportunities in other areas of the Adirondack Forest Preserve.

BE PREPARED BEFORE ENTERING THE BACK COUNTRY:
Know

  • Your own physical capabilities, knowledge of backcountry recreation and skill level
  • The distance you plan to travel and the terrain and conditions you will encounter

Check (before entering the backcountry)

  • With the local Forest Ranger for current information (518-897-1300)
  • Current weather conditions and short-term forecast

Wear

  • Appropriate outer wear and foot wear
  • Layers of non-cotton clothes

Carry

  • Map and compass – know how to use them and use them!
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Plenty of food and water

Pack

  • Extra clothes and socks
  • Hat and gloves or mittens
  • Ensolite pad to rest on and insulate your body from cold surfaces
  • Bivy sack or space blankets for extra warmth
  • Fire starter supplies – waterproof matches, butane lighter, candles, starter material, etc.

Always

  • Inform someone of your itinerary and when you expect to return

FIRE DANGER: HIGH

  • Use a cooking stove instead of a campfire to prepare meals.
  • If you do have a campfire, be sure to:
    • Use existing campfire rings;
    • Keep fires small;
    • Scrape away all litter, duff, and other burnable materials within a 10 foot diameter
    • Never leave a campfire unattended and Be sure all fires are completely out.

BEAR RESISTANT CANISTERS: Regulation requires the use of bear-resistant canisters by overnight users in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness between April 1 and November 30. NYSDEC encourages the use of bear resistant canisters throughout the Adirondacks. DEC and the manufacturer are discouraging the use of BearVault Canisters in the eastern High Peaks as bears are regularly defeating this type canister and obtaining the food stored inside.

Visit the Adirondack Trail Information web page for current weather forecasts, regulations, safety tips, trail conditions, and more.

Enjoy your visit to the Adirondacks!

Courtesy of: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

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Don’t Move Firewood

August 21st, 2012 · No Comments · News

Don't Move Firewood

DEC Continues Checkpoints for Illegally Transported Firewood

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DEC Continues Checkpoints for Illegally Transported Firewood

August 21st, 2012 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoSeven people were ticketed for transporting firewood more than 50 miles without certification of heat treatment at three checkpoints held by New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Environmental Conservation Police in the Adirondacks on Friday, August 17.

“DEC and its partners continue to educate campers and others about the importance of the firewood transportation regulation and preventing the spread of invasive insects,” said DEC Regional Director Robert Stegemann. “The level of compliance with the regulation indicates that the public is getting the message. We must make every effort to protect the forest preserve and private woodlands in the Adirondacks from invasive insects, including enforcement of the regulation for those who don’t comply.”

Two checkpoints were located near Lake George; one on the northbound off ramp of Exit 21 of the Northway (I-87) and the other nearby on Route 9N under the Northway overpass.

Approximately 7,000 vehicles were screened through these checkpoints to determine if they were transporting firewood. Thirty-one vehicles with firewood were inspected resulting in six people receiving tickets for violations of firewood transportation regulation. Violations included transporting wood from out of state, transporting wood from a quarantined and transporting from untreated firewood from more than 50 miles from its source.

In addition to being ticketed, the six people were provided information and educational material about the firewood transportation regulation and the dangers of spreading invasive insects. Their firewood was confiscated and bagged. It was later taken to the DEC Office in Warrensburg where it was chipped to destroy any potential invasive insects.

Six of the cars inspected were carrying firewood that had been heat treated in compliance with the regulation. Eight people were transporting firewood within 50 miles of the source but without a completed source certificate document as required by the regulation. They were issued warnings and provided assistance in completing the source certificate. DEC staff also provided information and educational material about the firewood transportation regulation and the dangers of spreading invasive insects.

Many campers that passed through the checkpoints explained that they were aware of the regulation and chose to comply with the regulations by obtaining wood locally.

Several trucks with logs passed through the checkpoint. These were inspected by staff from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and DEC’s Division of Lands and Forests inspected the trucks and found no violations. The drivers were provided information and education materials regarding the laws pertaining to the transport of logs.

The third checkpoint was located in the southern Adirondacks, on State Route 30 near the boundary line of Hamilton and Fulton counties. Only one ticket for illegally transporting firewood from out of state and seven warnings were issued to people who were transporting firewood within 50 miles of the source but without a completed source certificate document.

Again the illegally transported firewood was confiscated, bagged and transported to the DEC office in Northville for chipping. Source certifications were completed on site with DEC assistance. Educational information and material was provided to all firewood transporters.

Emerald ash borer - Agrilus planipennisEAB has been found in the Hudson Valley, the Catskills and Western New York. It is responsible for the destruction of more than 50 million ash trees in the United States since its discovery in Michigan in 2002. The main method of movement of EAB across the country has been through the transport of firewood to campgrounds. By transporting firewood, campers and homeowners could spread diseases and invasive insects that can quickly kill large numbers of trees.

Don’t Move Firewood – You Could be Killing Our Trees!

Help STOP THE SPREAD and obey the Firewood Regulation:

  • It is best to leave all firewood at home – please do not bring it to campgrounds or parks.
  • Get your firewood at the campground or from a local vendor – ask for a receipt or label that has the firewood’s local source.

If you choose to transport firewood within New York State:

  • It must have a receipt or label that has the firewood’s source and it must remain within 50 miles of that source.
  • For firewood not purchased (i.e. cut from your own property) you must have a Self-Issued Certificate of Source and it must be sourced within 50 miles of your destination.
  • Only firewood labeled as meeting New York’s heat treatment standards to kill pests (kiln-dried) may be transported into the state and further than 50 miles from the firewood’s source.

For more information on New York’s firewood regulation, call 1-866-640-0652 or visit the DEC web site at: Firewood and Invasive Insects. A map of quarantined counties can be view at: EAB – Quarantined Areas – Infestationsand Detections

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DEC Has Checkpoint for Illegally Transported Firewood

August 15th, 2012 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoThree people were ticketed for transporting firewood more than 50 miles without certification of heat treatment during a checkpoint held by New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Environmental Conservation Police in the Adirondacks.

“The spread of invasive insects through the illegal transportation of firewood must be prevented to protect both the Adirondack forest preserve and private woodland,” said DEC Regional Director Robert Stegemann. “Currently emerald ash borer is not found in or near the Adirondacks, we want to keep it that way.”

DEC Illegal Firewood CheckpointThe checkpoint was set up to check for illegal transportation of untreated firewood in violation of regulation and quarantine orders. Of all the vehicles passing through the checkpoint only three had firewood. Unfortunately, none of the three were in compliance with the firewood transport regulation. The illegal firewood was confiscated and chipped on site for disposal to prevent the potential spread of invasive insects.

Regulation prohibits the import of firewood into New York unless it has been heat treated to kill pests such as emerald ash borer (EAB). The regulation also limits the transportation of untreated firewood to less than 50 miles from its source. Quarantines restrict the movement of ash trees, ash products and firewood from all wood species in and around the areas where EAB has been found.

EAB has been found in the Hudson Valley, the Catskills and Western New York. It is responsible for the destruction of more than 50 million ash trees in the United States since its discovery in Michigan in 2002. The main method of movement of EAB across the country has been through the transport of firewood to campgrounds. By transporting firewood, campers and homeowners could spread diseases and invasive insects that can quickly kill large numbers of trees.

Don’t Move Firewood – You Could be Killing Our Trees!

Help STOP THE SPREAD and obey the Firewood Regulation:

  • It is best to leave all firewood at home – please do not bring it to campgrounds or parks.
  • Get your firewood at the campground or from a local vendor – ask for a receipt or label that has the firewood’s local source.

If you choose to transport firewood within New York state:

  • It must have a receipt or label that has the firewood’s source and it must remain within 50 miles of that source.
  • For firewood not purchased (i.e. cut from your own
  • property) you must have a Self-Issued Certificate of Source and it must be sourced within 50 miles of your destination.
  • Only firewood labeled as meeting New York’s heat treatment standards to kill pests (kiln-dried) may be transported into the state and further than 50 miles from the firewood’s source.

DEC Environmental Conservation Police will have more checkpoints across the state throughout the camping season.

For more information on New York firewood regulation, call 1-866-640-0652 or visit the DEC web site: Firewood and Invasive Insects.

A map of quarantined counties can be viewed here: EAB Infestations

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DEC Warns of High Fire Danger in the Adirondacks

July 12th, 2012 · No Comments · News

NYSDEC LogoThe Adirondacks and the surrounding region are at High Fire Danger Levels, warns the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Forest Rangers.

Recent warm and dry weather has created a “High Fire Danger” condition that allows wildfires to start easily and spread quickly with devastating effects. Three fires in the Adirondacks, one of which was started by an unattended campfire, have already burned eight acres of wild lands.

DEC strongly advises campers to be cautious with campfires:

  • Use existing campfire rings when possible and keep fires small.
  • Scrape away litter, duff, and any burnable material within a 10 foot diameter circle. This will keep the campfire from spreading.
  • Never leave a campfire unattended.
  • Drown the fire with water. Make sure all embers, coals, and sticks are wet. Stir the remains, add more water, and stir again.
  • Use a cooking stove instead of a campfire to prepare meals.
  • Campfires are prohibited in Eastern High Peaks Wilderness.

DEC warns residents and visitors to avoid burning brush at this time especially from late morning through early evening and whenever windy conditions are present. Never leave a fire unattended until it is completely out and all ashes and embers are cool.

Also be cautious with barbeque grills, keep them away from brush, grass and other flammable materials. Don’t dispose of charcoal ashes or embers out until they are cool to the touch. The illegal use of fireworks can also start wildfires and should be avoided.

The DEC Fire Safety Outdoors web page has additional safety tips for campfires and burning brush. More information on wildfire prevention may be found on the NY Firewise web pages.

Wildfire prevention is everyone’s responsibility. Do your part to keep New York safe from wildfires.

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Fire on Couch St

June 19th, 2011 · 2 Comments · News

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