Adirondack Base Camp header image

Entries Tagged as 'franklin county'

Adirondack Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Highlights: 4/13-4/19/15

April 21st, 2015 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

“DEC Forest Rangers’ knowledge of first aid, land navigation and technical rescue techniques are often critical to the success of their missions,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens. “Search and rescue missions often require Rangers to function in remote wilderness areas from rugged mountainous peaks to white-water rivers, and through vast forest areas from spruce-fir thicket to open hardwoods.”

Recent missions carried out by DEC Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks include:

Essex County
Giant Mountain Wilderness – Town of Keene
Overdue Hiker: On April 13, 2015 at 12:20 p.m., New York State Police received a call from the Canadian Provincial Police reporting a 30-year-old man from Quebec, Canada had not returned from a hiking trip to Iroquois Mountain. He was expected to return home on Sunday, April 12. DEC Forest Rangers located the man’s vehicle at the Roaring Brook Falls Trailhead in the Town of Keene at 1:05 p.m. Additional DEC Forest Rangers searched trails surrounding the area. At 2:05 p.m. the man walked out of the woods on his own. No further response was required and the incident was closed.

Taylor Pond Wild Forest – Town of Chesterfield
Lost Hikers: On April 13, 2015 at 7:50 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from three women reporting they were lost on Poke-o-Moonshine Mountain. The women, a 20-year-old from Ballston Lake, 20-year-old from Clifton Park, and 21-year-old also from Clifton Park, had come down a trail and followed a gravel road to a dead end. They were not properly dressed, had little water and food, and no flashlights. Essex County 911 obtained GPS coordinates from their cell phone and relayed the coordinates to the responding DEC Forest Ranger. The Ranger located the women at 8:57 p.m. He transported them back to their vehicle and the incident concluded at 9:15 p.m.

Franklin County
St. Regis Mohawk Reservation – Town of Bombay
Missing Child: On April 18, 2015 at 5:45 p.m., Franklin County 911 contacted DEC Forest Rangers requesting assistance in the search for a missing 10-year-old girl from Hogansburg, NY, on the St. Regis Mohawk Reservation. Forest Rangers arrived to find a 20-person crew, including family members, New York State Police, K9 units and members of the local Fire Department, already searching the woods. DEC Forest Rangers established an Incident Command Post and coordinated with the St. Regis Mohawk Tribal Police to search buildings on the south side of Route 37, east and west of where the girl was last seen. Tribal Police located the child in good health in a shed directly adjacent to her last known point.

Saratoga County
Private Land – Town of Corinth
Missing Individual: On April 18, 2015 at 3:00 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from Saratoga County Sheriff’s Office requesting DEC Forest Ranger assistance in locating a missing 54-year-old woman from Corinth, NY. The woman’s husband last saw her at 11:30 a.m. and became concerned after he realized she did not bring the necessary treatment for her medical condition. DEC Forest Rangers responded and located the woman at 4:00 p.m. on nearby private property. The woman had followed a creek and found her way to State Route 9N. Corinth EMS transported her for assessment.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry. Visit DEC’s Hiking Safety and Adirondack Trail Information webpages for more information.

Tags: ····

Adirondack Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Highlights: 3/16-3/22/15

March 23rd, 2015 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

“DEC Forest Rangers’ knowledge of first aid, land navigation and technical rescue techniques are often critical to the success of their missions,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens. “Search and rescue missions often require Rangers to function in remote wilderness areas from rugged mountainous peaks to white-water rivers, and through vast forest areas from spruce-fir thicket to open hardwoods.”


Recent missions carried out by DEC Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks include:

Essex County
Mt. Marcy – Town of Keene
Hiker Rescue: DEC Forest Rangers, Environmental Conservation Officers and State Police worked together on Sunday (3/22/15) in extreme weather conditions to successfully rescue a mother and her two sons on Mt. Marcy in Essex County. Governor Cuomo recognized the search and rescue teams for the great work. See Governor’s full news release.

Dix Mountain Wilderness – Town of North Hudson
Overdue Hikers: On March 16, 2015 at 10:33 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call reporting an overdue hiking party. The 35-year-old man from Cross River, NY and the 35-year-old woman from Pattersonville, NY started out from the Clear Pond Gate in Keene at 6:08 a.m. to hike Macomb, South Six, Grace Peak, Hough and Dix mountains. At 5 p.m., the hiking party texted the caller stating they had completed three of the five peaks but had not heard from the party since. One DEC Forest Ranger, responding on snowmobile, located the couple at 12:30 a.m. They had to break trail while descending Dix, which slowed them down. The Ranger found the couple in good health and provided them a ride back to their vehicle. No medical attention was required and they were released. The incident concluded at 1:15 a.m.

Franklin County
Saranac Lake Wild Forest – Town of Harrietstown
Lost snowshoer: On March 20, 2015 at 6:00 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call reporting a 78-year-old man from Saranac Lake, NY was overdue from returning from an afternoon hike on a herd path going to Lower Saranac Lake. The hiking party began its snowshoe at 1:00 p.m. and the group was separated at approximately 2:30 p.m. while attempting to go around a blowdown. Three members of the group returned to their vehicles at 5:00 p.m. They called for assistance after realizing the missing member had not returned to his vehicle. The first DEC Forest Ranger arrived on scene at 6:35 p.m. Three additional Rangers also responded; two were already on snowmobile patrol in the area. Rangers located the lost snowshoer who was exhausted but otherwise in good condition. The batteries for his GPS device had died leaving him unable to navigate back to his car. Rangers returned him to his vehicle at 7:30 p.m.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry. Visit DEC’s Hiking Safety and Adirondack Trail Information webpages for more information.

Tags: ··

Adirondack Forest Ranger Search And Rescue Highlights: 3/2-3/8/15

March 10th, 2015 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

“DEC Forest Rangers’ knowledge of first aid, land navigation and technical rescue techniques are often critical to the success of their missions,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens. “Search and rescue missions often require Rangers to function in remote wilderness areas from rugged mountainous peaks to white-water rivers, and through vast forest areas from spruce-fir thicket to open hardwoods.”


Recent missions carried out by DEC Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks include:

Essex County
High Peaks Wilderness – Town of Keene
Injured hiker: On March 8, 2015 at 12:40 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from the hiking companion of an injured man on Lower Wolfjaw. The 32-year-old Schenectady man slipped while descending the mountain, resulting in an injury to his ankle that left him unable to walk. DEC Forest Rangers responded and reached the injured man at 4:11 p.m. They put a splint around his ankle and transported him to the Lower Wolfjaw lean-to at approximately 7:00 p.m. to meet additional DEC Forest Rangers on snowmobiles. The Rangers placed the injured man on a litter and towed him by snowmobile through the south side of John’s Brook to Smith Way. At Smith Way, Keene Valley Fire and Rescue Ambulance met the party and transported the injured man to Elizabethtown Hospital for treatment at 9:16 p.m. The incident concluded at 10:20 p.m. Fifteen DEC Forest Rangers assisted in the rescue.

Franklin County
Saranac Lakes Wild Forest – Town of Harrieststown
Lost snowshoer: On March 7, 2015 at 8:00 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from a snowshoer reporting he was lost on a trail near Saranac Inn. The 27-year-old man from Saranac Lake, NY did not have a map or compass. He found his way to the railroad tracks but could not determine which direction led back to his vehicle. One DEC Forest Ranger responded via snowmobile, locating the lost man and returning him to his vehicle at 9:10 p.m. in good condition.

St. Lawrence County
Grass River Conservation Easement – Town of Colton
Injured snowmobiler: On March 7, 2015 at 10:00 p.m., Franklin County 911 informed DEC Ray Brook Dispatch of a snowmobile accident in the Town of Colton, St. Lawrence County. The accident happened on the 7A trail about 6 miles south of the snowplow turnaround on Massawepie Rd. One DEC Forest Ranger and the Tupper Lake Rescue Squad responded. A 49-year-old man from Flanders, NY was with two friends headed to the Long Lake area when his snowmobile veered off the west side of the trail, traveled down an 8-foot embankment and hit a small spruce tree. A member of the Tupper Lake Rescue Squad was on scene tending to the injured man when a DEC Forest Ranger arrived. They placed him on a backboard and covered him with blankets and heat pads. A trail groomer responded to the scene to evacuate the man, who was brought to an awaiting ambulance in the Town of Conifer at about 2 a.m. and then transported to Adirondack Medical Center in Saranac Lake. Crews cleared the incident by 2:30 a.m.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry. Visit DEC’s Hiking Safety and Adirondack Trail Information webpages for more information.

Tags: ······

DEC to Prepare Management Plan for Northern Franklin County State Forests

December 3rd, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Public Meeting Scheduled for December 17 in Malone

NYSDEC LogoThe state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) will develop a unit management plan for 21,239 acres of public lands in the Northern Franklin County State Forests, DEC Region 5 Director Robert Stegemann announced today.

The Northern Franklin State Forest includes five state forests (St. Regis River, Deer River, Titusville Mountain, Valley View and Trout River), seven detached forest preserve parcels, a state fish hatchery and over 50 miles of public fishing rights. The lands are located in the towns of Bangor, Bellmont, Brandon, Chateaugay, Constable, Dickinson, Malone, Moira and Westville.

“DEC is seeking public input on how to best manage these lands and provide access for outdoor recreational activities including hunting, fishing, trapping, hiking, camping, wildlife watching and other activities,” said Director Stegemann.

A public meeting will be held at the North County Community College Campus, Resheketina Hall, Room RH-208 at 75 Williams St. in Malone on Wednesday, December 17, beginning at 6 p.m. The facility is wheelchair accessible. Please provide any requests for specific accommodation in advance to DEC at 518-897-1248.

The meeting will provide an opportunity for the public to meet with DEC staff and share thoughts, ideas and suggestions regarding management of State lands within this particular unit. This will be the first of several opportunities for the public to be involved in the planning process.

Natural features in the Northern Franklin Unit include the St. Regis River, Deer River, Salmon River, Trout River and Chateaugay River; Titusville Mountain, Mount Immortelle and Elephant’s Head; and Huckleberry Marsh. The primary recreational uses are hunting and fishing, hiking, camping, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling and bird and wildlife watching. The trails to Elephant’s Head and High Falls on Titusville Mountain State Forest and the campsites on Deer River State Forest are used often by the public.

Management issues under consideration by DEC’s planning team include public recreational access, habitat management, and forest management and forest products sales. Upon completion of a thorough resource inventory, an analysis of current and potential uses, and review of public comments, the Northern Franklin planning team will prepare a draft UMP. The public will have the opportunity to review and comment on the draft UMP.

Proposed management actions will be guided by DEC’s Strategic Plan for State Forest Management which focuses on ecosystem health and diversity, economic benefits, recreational opportunities, forest conservation and sustainable management. The completed draft plan will be widely distributed for public review and comment and a public meeting will be scheduled to discuss the draft.

Any interested individual or organization wanting to submit comments may contact Forester Ethan Pierce by mail at NYSDEC, P.O. Box 296, Ray Brook, NY 12977; by telephone at 518-897-1291; or by e-mail at R5.UMP@dec.ny.gov.

Tags: ···

DEC Announces New Trail For Goodman Mountain in Franklin County

August 27th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Trail Dedicated to Honor the Memory of Andrew Goodman

NYSDEC LogoThe trail up Goodman Mountain in Franklin County, Town of Tupper Lake, is now complete, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens announced today. The Goodman Mountain trail is dedicated in honor and memory of civil rights activist Andrew Goodman. The new trailhead parking area and first quarter mile of the trail is wheelchair accessible and ideal for families with young children and people with limited mobility. The trail steepens before turning sharply and ascending to the 2,176-foot summit, where hikers will enjoy scenic views of the Adirondacks.

“This new trail is a great example of Governor Cuomo’s commitment to increasing access to outdoor recreation for New Yorkers and visitors to our state,” Commissioner Martens said. “The Governor has placed emphasis on creating facilities that welcome visitors of all abilities to explore state lands and providing an ever-increasing range of accessible opportunities. I am proud to help dedicate this trail to honor the memory of Andrew Goodman, frequently hiked to the summit of this mountain with his family as a young man from their nearby camp on Tupper Lake.”
Commissioner Martens and others on Goodman Mountain

Construction of the new trail was a joint effort amongst outdoor enthusiasts living in Tupper Lake, DEC staff and the Adirondack Park Agency. The trailhead parking area is on the east site of state route 30 just south of Tupper Lake. The trail begins with a .75-mile of gentle grade that follows the original highway leading south from Tupper Lake. The remaining mile is a pleasant stroll to the summit which provides views of Tupper Lake and the Adirondacks.

John L. Quinn, councilman and local volunteer said, “The Town of Tupper Lake is proud to co-host, along with the DEC and the Wild Center, a ceremony marking the dedication of a new trail to the summit of Goodman Mountain in Tupper Lake. The trail was established to honor the memory of slain civil rights activist Andrew Goodman who, with his family, has had a long-standing connection to our community that began in the 1930’s and continues to this day. The layout and construction of this trail was completed in a cooperative effort between DEC Region 6 staff and local volunteers. It is the Town’s hope that this new trail will be enjoyed by all and permanently serve as a tribute to Mr. Goodman’s sacrifice of 50 years ago.”

In June 1964, during “Freedom Summer” at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, 20-year old Andrew Goodman and fellow civil rights workers James Chaney and Michael Schwerner were murdered by the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi while working to register African-Americans to vote. Their murders served to galvanize public support for the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and resulted in the first successful federal prosecution of a civil rights case in Mississippi. The 1988 movie “Mississippi Burning” was loosely based upon this national tragedy. 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of both Andrew Goodman’s murder (June 21, 1964) and passage of the Civil Rights Act (July 2, 1964).

David Goodman, brother of Andrew said, “The Goodman Family is profoundly appreciative of the interest that Tupper Lake, and larger Adirondack Community, has shown over the years regarding the tragic fate of Andrew Goodman while he worked for peoples’ right to vote in Mississippi in 1964. Leaders in Tupper Lake have included the Bill Frenette Family, who successfully endeavored to name Goodman Mountain after my brother Andrew. In addition, others include John Quinn of Tupper Lake, The Wild Center, volunteer workers and so many others who have worked closely with DEC to install a beautiful trail to the summit of this state owned mountain. Under the direction of Commissioner Martens and his extraordinary staff, DEC has done a wonderful job throughout New York and the Adirondacks, bringing the natural beauty of the Empire State to all the people who want to experience it. Visitors to Tupper Lake will now have the opportunity to learn about Andrew Goodman and be reminded of this important event and its connection to local history.”

Litchfield Mountain was renamed Goodman Mountain by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2002 at the request of then Town of Tupper Lake Historian William Frenette. That renaming honored the memory of Charles Goodman and his grandson Andrew Goodman. The Goodman Family has strong ties to the community of Tupper Lake, having spent summers here since the 1930s at a camp built by Charles Goodman near Bog River Falls on Tupper Lake. Charles Goodman was responsible for the development of Lumberjack Spring in 1937, near the site of the trail head parking area.

Senator Hugh T. Farley said “I am pleased to extend my congratulations to all involved in developing this new hiking trail to the top of Goodman Mountain. This will provide additional recreational opportunities for visitors and local residents alike. This new trail, and dedication events, also provide a wonderful opportunity to remember and honor the Goodman family.”

“A new trail for families and visitors to enjoy is great news for beautiful Tupper Lake,” said Senator Betty Little. “How fitting to recognize and honor slain civil rights activist Andrew Goodman, a courageous trailblazer with a connection to this community whose sacrifice led to freedom and a better way of life for many others.”

Assemblyman Marc Butler said, “I am pleased to congratulate the DEC for their efforts in opening a new hiking trail in the Tupper Lake area for the public to use.”

Assemblywoman Janet L. Duprey said, “I regret a previous Assembly commitment prevents me from attending the Commemoration of the Goodman Mountain Trail at the Wild Center. I have had the opportunity to meet members of Andrew Goodman’s family In Tupper Lake and this tribute to Andy is most fitting. Andy was a strong advocate for the civil rights of all people, a tradition carried on by his family through the Goodman Foundation. Thanks to DEC for recognizing Andy Goodman with this honor.”

Mecca E. Santana, Esq. Chief Diversity Officer for NYS said, “Having spent the entirety of my professional life fighting for justice and equality, I ?am both honored and humbled to participate in this historic dedication ceremony celebrating the life and accomplishments of Andrew Goodman. The sacrifices of Andrew, and so many others who came before and after him, will never be forgotten.”

The parking lot, bridge, signs and trail were constructed with funding from the Environmental Protection Fund. Total costs were approximately $4350. Goodman Mountain is within the Horseshoe Lake Wild Forest and managed by the DEC Region 6 Lands and Forests staff in Watertown, NY. See more information on Adirondack trails .

Governor Cuomo has expanded recreational opportunities for residents and tourists, positioning New York State as a recreation destination, connecting communities to state lands, and improving the quality of life. This year’s State budget includes $6 million in NY Works funding to support the creation of 50 new land and water access projects to connect hunters, anglers, bird watchers and others who enjoy the outdoors to more than 380,000 acres of existing state and easement lands that have not reached their full potential. These 50 new access projects include building new boat launches, installing new hunting blinds and building new trails and parking areas.

Tags: ···

Loon Lake Mountain

August 24th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack Life

Can’t believe it took so long to finally do this hike.

Loon Lake Mountain FiretowerPanoramioLoon Lake Mountain Trail Map


View East

Tags: ··

DEC Announces $475,000 in Upgrades Planned for Upper Saranac Lake Boat Launch

August 14th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Launch Will Close September 8 to Facilitate Repairs and Reopen May 2015

NYSDEC LogoTo support improved access to Upper Saranac Lake, $475,000 in upgrades will be made to the Upper Saranac Lake Boat Launch, state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens announced today. The upgrades, funded by NY Works, will be completed prior to the 2015 Memorial Day Weekend.

“Governor Cuomo has demonstrated a strong commitment to increasing access to the state’s beautiful natural resources,” Commissioner Martens said. “Upgrades to the Upper Saranac boat launch will allow outdoor enthusiasts easier access to recreate on this magnificent lake and will better protect the lake’s water quality.”

The boat launch, located at the intersection of County 46 and Back Bay Road, is one of two public boat launches that provide access to Upper Saranac Lake. The planned improvements include:

  • constructing a new (2 lane) boat ramp;
  • removing dock cribbing;
  • installing new floating docks;
  • regrading slopes to decrease steepness and decrease erosion;
  • paving the entrance, ramp entrance and parking area;
  • permanent stormwater pollution prevention measures;
  • reconfiguring traffic patterns;
  • upgrading bathroom facility;
  • landscaping and planting;
  • adding a dry hydrant for fire protection; and
  • adding a boat rinse station to flush out bilges, live wells and areas containing water.

Governor Cuomo included $6 million in NY Works funding in this year’s budget to support creating 50 new land and water access projects to connect hunters, anglers, bird watchers and others who enjoy the outdoors to more than 380,000 acres of existing state and easement lands that have not reached their full potential. These 50 new access projects include building new boat launches, installing new hunting blinds and building new trails and parking areas. In addition, the 2014-15 budget includes $4 million to repair the state’s fish hatcheries; and renews and allows expanded use of crossbows for hunting in New York State.

Camp owners and others that use the Upper Saranac Lake Boat Launch to take their boat off the lake for the winter will need to use private marinas to launch or retrieve boats during the reconstruction period, September 8, 2014 through May 15, 2015.

Small boats can use the boat launch at DEC’s Fish Creek Pond Campground. Shallow water at the boat launch and less than eight feet height between the water and the bottom of a campground road near the boat launch allows only small boats to use the Fish Creek Campground Boat Launch. There is no fee to launch or retrieve a boat, but there is an $8.00 parking fee for vehicles.

The renovated boat launch will be open for public use prior to Memorial Day Weekend 2015.

Tags: ···