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Entries Tagged as 'franklin county'

DEC Opens Trail to Loon Lake Mountain Fire Tower

October 10th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoA 2.8-mile trail to the fire tower on the summit of Loon Lake Mountain in the northern Adirondacks is complete and open to the public, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Regional Director Robert Stegemann announced today.

“DEC is committed to providing greater access to the many natural and man-made features found on the forest preserve and conservation easement lands we manage,” said Director Stegemann.

The new trail includes a parking area and trailhead on the west side of County Route 26 in the Town of Franklin in Franklin County, approximately 4.7 miles north of the hamlet of Loon Lake. The trailhead and the lower portion of the trail are on the Kushaqua Tract Conservation Easement Lands (CEL), while the upper portion is on forest preserve lands in the Debar Mountain Wild Forest.

The trail rises more than 1,600 feet from the trailhead to the 2,264-foot summit of Loon Lake Mountain. The open bedrock summit provides views of Lyon Mountain, Whiteface Mountain, the High Peaks Wilderness Area, Debar Mountain and other nearby summits.

The Loon Lake Fire Tower is a 35-foot Aermotor tower that was originally erected in 1917. It was rebuilt in 1928 after being blown over by hurricane force winds in the winter of 1927-28. The fire tower is listed on the New York State Register of Historic Places. Presently the fire tower is not open to the public and the bottom set of stair risers has been removed to discourage the public from climbing the tower or accessing the cab.

The trail, trailhead and parking were constructed this past summer by DEC Region 5 Operations crews and members of the Student Conservation Association (SCA) Adirondack Program. The facilities could not have been provided without the cooperation of the owner of the conservation easement lands, Lyme Timber Company of Hanover, New Hampshire.

The Town of Franklin Highway Department will plow the parking area in the winter to allow access to the trail and surrounding forest preserve and conservation easement lands by winter recreation enthusiasts for activities like hiking, hunting, trapping, skiing and snowshoeing.

The Loon Lake Mountain trailhead/parking area is located on County Route 26, approximately 7.8 miles north of its intersection with State Route 3 which is approximately 16 miles east of Saranac Lake.

Campers using either of the two campsites on the Plumadore-Inman Public Use Area on the east side of County Route 26 in the Sable Highlands Conservation Easement Lands are encouraged to use the new Loon Lake Mountain trailhead/parking area.

Food and gas can be found in the nearby communities of Vermontville, Bloomingdale, Gabriels and Redford. The closest available lodging opportunities are available in Saranac Lake and Lake Placid, and a wide variety of developed and primitive camping opportunities are available in-season within a 20-mile radius of the trailhead.

A map of the trail and surrounding area can be viewed and downloaded from the DEC website at Loon Lake Mountain Trail Map.

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The New York State Police continue efforts in the search for Colin Gillis

September 20th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

The New York State Police, in conjunction with New York State DEC and Forest Rangers, are reminding the public of a missing person case, hoping they can assist in the search.

Missing Child - Colin Gillis

On March 11, 2012 around 2:00 AM, Colin Gillis, age 18, of Tupper Lake, New York, was last seen walking along State Route 3 between Tupper Lake and Piercefield. At the time, Gillis was wearing a white T-shirt with black stripes, blue jeans, red sneakers and a red and black down jacket. He is 6 foot tall, 170 lbs, and has blonde hair and blue eyes.

State Police are reminding those who are planning on participating in the upcoming hunting seasons, to be observant for anything unusual or out of the ordinary while they are in the woods. If the public observes anything they wish to report, or has any information in regards to Colin’s disappearance, contact the New York State Police at (518) 897-2000.

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11th Annual Great Adirondack Birding Celebration

April 22nd, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Paul Smith’s College VIC 31 May – 2 June 2013

Adirondack Bird WatchingThe 11th annual Great Adirondack Birding Celebration is scheduled for 31 May – 2 June 2013, at the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) in Paul Smiths, New York. The event will feature field trips to boreal birding hot spots, informative lectures, and workshops. Field trips include: an all-day Birding Across the Adirondacks trip on Friday, plus a selection of half-day field trips on Saturday and Sunday (Birding by Ear at the VIC, Beginner Birder Workshop at the VIC, Bloomingdale Bog, Intervale Lowlands, Little Clear Pond for loons, Madawaska Flow, Spring Pond Bog, and Whiteface Mountain).

The keynote speaker on Friday night is Sara R. Morris, professor of Biology and the Program Coordinator of the Environmental Science Program at Canisius College. Dr. Morris will speak on bird migration. The keynote speaker on Saturday night is Michale Glennon, Coordinator for the Adirondack Program at the Wildlife Conservation Society. Dr. Glennon will speak on the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Boreal Bird Project.

Some of the boreal species that participants in the Great Adirondack Birding Celebration hope to find include the Black-backed Woodpecker, American Three-toed Woodpecker, Boreal Chickadee, Spruce Grouse, Bicknell’s Thrush and a variety of migrating warblers.

The 3,000-acre Paul Smiths VIC contains every habitat type found in the Adirondack Park with the exception of alpine vegetation. Included on the property is a 60-acre marsh, five ponds, several brooks and swamps, bogs, fens, and varied forest types, most notably northern boreal forest. The site includes significant glacial and geological features and provides scenic vistas of Saint Regis Mountain and Jenkins Mountain. The VIC property includes 6 miles of interpretive trails and 8 miles of back country trails for spring, summer, and fall use.

Festival Hours:

Friday, 31 May: 9:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday, 1 June: 6:00 AM to 8:30 PM
Sunday, 2 June: 6:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Preregistration is required. Registration opens 1 May 2013.

For more information: http://bit.ly/17IyIiL

(Photo: Courtesy of ARTC)

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Man Charged by DEC for Illegal Trapping Pleads Guilty

March 20th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoA Franklin County man pleaded guilty last week to 31 violations of Environmental Conservation Law related to illegal trapping, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation announced today.

On February 11, DEC Environmental Conservation Police charged Terry J. Hurteau, 56, of Tupper Lake, for offenses including unlawfully setting 15 snares for coyote, multiple counts for unlawful use of body gripping traps on land and multiple counts of failing to tag traps. He was issued appearance tickets for the Town of Tupper Lake Court.

DEC Environmental Conservation Officers (ECOs) initially responded to complaints about a coyote running through the yards of some Tupper Lake residence. The callers reported that the coyote appeared injured and tangled in what appeared to be wire.

ECOs located the coyote by tracking it through the snow. Due to the extent of its injuries and its entanglement in the snare, the animal was euthanized. However, the ECOs were able to use the snare to begin the investigation which led them to Hurteau.

Hurteau’s activities were extreme and flagrant violations of trapping law and regulation. They do not reflect the behavior of the vast majority of ethical trappers.

Hurteau appeared in court on March 6, and pleaded guilty to all charges. He was ordered to pay total of $3,875 in fines and surcharges.

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Maple sweetness at The Wild Center and Paul Smith’s College VIC

February 5th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Events scheduled for February and March

PAUL SMITHS, NY – The recent cold temperatures bode well for a good maple syrup season – and in February and March, The Wild Center and the Paul Smith’s College VIC will host several events showcasing how to make (and enjoy!) this quintessential springtime treat.

Over four weekends, watch how the sweet sap of trees becomes the highlight of a pancake breakfast and learn other ways to use this natural sweetener at a series of demonstrations, activities and events in both Tupper Lake and Paul Smiths.

Northern New York Maple Project

The Paul Smith’s College VIC will host two workshops for people interested in establishing their own backyard maple sugaring operations.

  • Toss out your old-fashioned maple taps – on Saturday, Feb. 16, from 1-4 p.m., learn how to set up a modern tubing system with Mike Farrell, director of the Cornell Maple Program. A brief classroom session will be followed by hands-on work at the VIC’s sugar maple demonstration site. Topics will include preparing the sugar bush prior to tubing installation; site considerations; line placement and installation; tapping trees; sanitation; and sap collection. Please dress for the weather and be prepared for a 2-3 mile snowshoe walk on groomed trails and uneven terrain. Bring your own snowshoes or borrow a pair from the VIC.
  • On Saturday, March 23, from 1-4 p.m., learn about the art of maple sugaring with special emphasis on backyard tapping, collection and boiling. At this event, part of New York State’s Maple Weekend, Paul Smith’s College students will lead workshops and provide tours of the sugarhouse and the maple demonstration site. Includes program and tastings for the whole family.

The Wild Center will also host a pair of workshops on Sunday, Feb. 24, and Saturday, March 16, to launch Tupper Lake’s first-ever community maple sugaring project. The project, one of the first in the state, invites area residents to tap maple trees in their own yards. The Wild Center will collect the sap daily once it starts to flow, ultimately boiling it down into maple syrup.

To participate, attend the free “Art of Maple Sugaring Breakfast and Workshop.” Registered participants will get a pancake breakfast, an introduction to the natural history of maple trees, expert instruction and tapping tools. Additional supplies will be available for purchase from The Wild Supply Company. Advanced registration is required; attendance at either workshop is necessary to participate in the project. Families are encouraged to attend.

After the workshops end, it’s all maple all day at The Wild Center, with maple stories, crafts and tastings on Feb. 24 and March 16. The Adirondack Museum will share local maple sugaring stories through historical objects and pictures from the past. Get insight into the sugaring process from experienced naturalists at 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. as they discuss tapping trees, processing sap, and – the sweet part – maple sugar. Take a closer look at an operational evaporator, catch some running sap and drill your own tap as we explore the local maple-sugaring story.

All events are free and open to the public. Registration is required. Visit Maple Weekends to register for events at The Wild Center or call (518) 359-7800. For events at the Paul Smith’s College VIC, contact Brian McDonnell at (518) 327-6241 or bmcdonnell@paulsmiths.edu. For more information, please visit us online at www.northernnewyorkmaple.com.

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Presidents Week at The Wild Center

February 5th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Wild Center LogoTupper Lake, NY – Don’t miss Presidents Week at The Wild Center, February 17th – February 24th as we celebrate the season with a week of wintery Adirondack fun. Everyday there is a new winter theme and activities for the whole family to enjoy. In addition to special daily winter programming there will be guided snowshoe walks, live animal encounters, and warm winter beverages. For more information, visit The WILD Center – Events.

Saturday, February 16th
Join us for opening day of Winter Week as we celebrate winter in the Adirondacks! Get outside and try your hand at snowshoeing with one of our naturalists. Or stay inside to learn about winter adventuring and to meet some of our Adirondack animals, whose adaptations allow them to cope with the harsh Adirondack winters in intriguing ways.

Sunday, February 17th
Noon theater program and 2:00 pm walk
Animal Tracking with Vince Walsh

Join Vince Walsh for a day on animal tracking and signs to learn how you can see, identify and interpret the natural world of the Adirondacks. Vince will share his experience and insight through multiple public programs starting with a 12:00 pm theater presentation on winter and its influences on animal behavior. Then bring your tracking questions, pictures and stories to Vince as he puzzles over your tracking experiences and discoveries. Don’t forget to bring some warm clothes so at 2:00 pm you can head outside to practice your tracking skills and use all your senses to see what evidence of animals you can find in the Adirondack forest. Snowshoes will be provided free with admission.

Monday, February 18th – 1:00 pm
Wild about Winter

Join naturalist and entertainer Rob Carr for a wild theater program about Adirondack animals in the winter. Filled with stories, humor, puppets and LOTS of live animals, it is guaranteed to please visitors of all ages.

Tuesday, February 19th – 1:00 pm
Winter Birds of the Adirondacks

Where have all the birdies gone? While it might seem like all our birds fly south when the weather gets chilly, there are plenty that stick around and tough out the Adirondack winters. Meet LIVE Adirondack birds in our theater at 1:00 pm for a fascinating program about birds and their winter adaptations. Follow up with a 2:00 pm bird walk along our trails, looking for signs of these tenacious feathered fliers and talking about the ways different species adapt for the cold.

Wednesday, February 20th – 1:00 pm
Creatures of the Night

Nighttime animals love the long winter nights. Join us in Planet Adirondack at 1:00 pm to meet live creatures of the night and get a glimpse into their nighttime habits.

Thursday, February 21st – 1:00 pm
Putting the Myth on Ice

Bears sleep all winter, plants stop growing and all birds fly south…or do they? Join naturalist Andrea Schwander for a fun-filled theater program of breaking down misconceptions and myth busting. The program will focus on some animal and winter myths, and will feature audience participation, demonstrations, and of course, some of The Wild Center’s live animals.

Friday, February 22nd – 1:00 pm
Brrrrrrrrreakfast

Not many choose to brave the cold Adirondack winters, not even in the animal kingdom. Lucky for us we have a couple of LIVE animals that tend to stick around instead of hightailing it to warmer areas. Come to our afternoon theater program to learn about their adaptations for obtaining food and energy in the long cold days of winter.

Saturday, February 23rd – 1:00 pm
The Travel Troupe

Join The Wild Center in welcoming the Ronathahonni Cultural Center’s Travel Troupe. Come learn about their cultural history through song, dance and storytelling at 1:00 pm in our Flammer Theater.

Sunday, February 24th – 9:00 am
Pancake Breakfast and Sugaring Workshop

The Wild Center is joining Tupper Lake community members and their sugar maple trees to create a community-driven Maple Sugar house. For local residents: register for the 9:00 am free Pancake Breakfast and Sugaring Workshop to learn more about our community maple project. Register at www.wildcenter.org/events and see how you can get involved.

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DEC Region 5 Forest Ranger’s August & September Search and Rescue Report

January 11th, 2013 · No Comments · News

The Adirondacks - Our Great National Playground
A little bit scary how many people are heading into the woods unprepared.
Full report after the jump.

  • Lost hikers and biker – Stay together when hiking in groups and know the location of all group members at all times. Always carry a map and compass, and know how to use them. Always carry a flashlight or headlamp and extra batteries. Always inform someone of your itinerary including an expected return time.
  • Bee sting and other injuries – Accidents can happen. Always carry a first aid kit and contact the DEC Forest Rangers at 518-891-0235 in backcountry emergencies.
  • Exausted people and dog – Know your abilities, the area you plan to hike, and the abilities of your hiking partner, including pets; be sure that all are capable of any planned hikes.

Read the rest of this entry »

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