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Entries Tagged as 'heritage'

Valuing the Adirondack Forest

February 19th, 2015 · No Comments · Miscellania

“This region has, within a few years, come into great prominence and is now attracting much attention by reason of its economic and sanitary importance. Its mineral resources were at one time thought to be great, but these sink into insignificance when compared to the value now placed upon its forests. The state has awakened to an appreciation of the value of these forests and has taken measures looking toward their preservation and utilization. It would make them not only a permanent possession, but contributors to health, wealth and knowledge.” ~ C.H Peck, NYS Botanist 1899

Adirondack Lodge, Town of North Elba
Bonus Map from his book, “Plants of North Elba“.

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Town of North Elba, Essex Co. N.Y. (1899)

February 19th, 2015 · No Comments ·

Town of North Elba, Essex Co. N.Y. (1899)
Back to Valuing the Adirondack ForestAbout this Item



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High Peaks of the Adirondacks

November 20th, 2014 · 3 Comments · Miscellania

High Peaks of the Adirondacks (1884)
(click, then click the arrow to zoom)

Source

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Sectional View of the High Peaks

April 17th, 2014 · No Comments · Miscellania

Altitudes by Barometer & Telescopic Level

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Ride the Train for Pleasure and Health

November 1st, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack Life

These paper drinking cups, manufactured by Stone & Forsyth Co., are at least 100 years old. By 1914, they were replaced by the “Baldwin Finback” which were more “Convenient, Hygienic — Safe”.

Delaware & Hudson Paper Cup



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Water Drinking in Public Places - ExcerptStone & Forsyth Co.

The Delaware and Hudson R.R.

I guess with all the sick heading to the mountains to “take the cure”, it really was best to avoid spreading germs. Read more about Water Drinking in Public Places.

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DEC Issues Draft Unit Management Plans for Firetower Historic Areas

October 16th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

DEC accepts comments on Draft Unit Management Plans until November 15

NYSDEC LogoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) released the draft unit management plans (UMPs) for the Hurricane Mountain Fire Tower Historic Area and the Saint Regis Mountain Fire Tower Historic Area, Commissioner Joe Martens announced today. The UMPs contain management proposals for the fire observation towers located on the summit of Hurricane Mountain in the Town of Keene, Essex County, and the summit of Saint Regis Mountain in the Town of Santa Clara, Franklin County. If approved and implemented, the UMPs would result in increased tourism opportunities in Essex and Franklin counties.

“As Governor Cuomo continues his commitment to spur tourism, the release of these draft unit management plans is another step in ensuring these historically significant resources will be enjoyed for many generations to come,” Commissioner Martens said. “Throughout the 20th century, fire towers played a critical role in the protection of New York State’s natural resources, and resuming maintenance of these structures for educational purposes will attract travelers and provide the public a better appreciation of that legacy.”

The Hurricane Mountain fire tower was discontinued for use as a fire observation station in 1979, and the Saint Regis Mountain fire tower was shut down in 1990. Both structures have been closed to the public ever since. The UMPs propose to restore the two fire towers to a condition that will accommodate full public access of the structures and include interpretive materials related to the towers’ history.

UMPs for each unit of State land in the Adirondack Park are required by the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan, which was amended in 2010 to create the two new Historic Areas. Previously, the summit of Hurricane Mountain was part of the Hurricane Mountain Primitive (now Wilderness) Area, and the summit of Saint Regis Mountain was part of the Saint Regis Canoe Area.

The plans are available for public review at DEC headquarters in Albany (625 Broadway) and DEC Region 5 headquarters in Ray Brook (1115 State Route 86). CDs of the plan will be available at these same locations, as well as the offices for the Town of Santa Clara in Franklin County and the Town of Keene in Essex County. The Hurricane UMP may be viewed or downloaded at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/78001.html and the Saint Regis UMP may be viewed or downloaded at: http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/78006.html.

DEC will accept comments on the draft UMPs today through November 15. Comments may be sent to Josh Clague, Natural Resources Planner, DEC, 625 Broadway – 5th Floor, Albany, NY 12233-4254 or emailed to lfadk@gw.dec.state.ny.us.

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Rare French & Indian War Musket Donated to Fort Ticonderoga

April 8th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Ticonderoga, NY – Through the keen eye of a museum supporter and generosity of an important donor, a rare British musket that may have seen use at Fort Ticonderoga has recently joined the museum’s collection enabling Fort Ticonderoga to more completely interpret the site’s remarkable history.
Fort Ticonderoga

Fort Ticonderoga’s Curator of Collections, Christopher Fox said “The donation of this Wilson musket fills an important and long-standing gap in the collection. It is a type we know was used by troops who served at the Fort. It is also an important reminder of the struggles armies sometimes faced in arming their troops in wartime and the great diversity of arms that found their way into military service as a result.”
Wilson Musket, Fort Ticonderoga Museum Collection.

The Wilson musket will be placed on exhibit this season in the museum’s highly acclaimed exhibit Bullets & Blades: The Weapons of America’s Colonial Wars and Revolution. The exhibit, featuring over 150 weapons, tells the story of the use of military and civilian weapons in America during the 17th and 18th centuries. Fort Ticonderoga’s collection of 18th-century military objects is celebrated as one of the best of its type in the world.

During the French & Indian War, the London gun maker Richard Wilson produced muskets to arm the militias of several American colonies including New York, New Jersey, probably Massachusetts. Though they bear similarities to muskets produced for the British army, the weapons produced by Richard Wilson are not “army” muskets, they are “commercial” or “contract” muskets.” Their brass parts, stocks, and barrels resemble British army guns, but are simpler and lighter overall. Of the estimated 4,000 contract weapons that may have been produced by Wilson, only a handful has survived through today.

The potential connection with Fort Ticonderoga’s history stretches back to the British army’s planned invasion of Canada and the disastrous attack on the French lines on July 8, 1758. As British General James Abercromby was preparing his 17,000-man army, he had considerable difficulty obtaining enough weapons to arm his troops. Among the weapons he was eventually able to acquire were 1,000 muskets owned by the City of New York. These weapons had originally been purchased by the city from Richard Wilson in 1755. While it is not known with absolute certainty, it is thought that at least some of those weapons were issued to New York Provincial troops. Many of those troops took part in the battle before the French lines on July 8. It is known, however, that many of Wilson’s muskets were used at Ticonderoga as numerous brass pieces of these guns have been recovered on the site during various periods of reconstruction.

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