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Entries Tagged as 'hike'

DEC Guidance for Discouraging Nuisance Black Bear

July 24th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoThe summer outdoor recreation season is well underway and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is advising homeowners and tourists about ways to discourage bears from becoming a nuisance. Black bears will take advantage of almost any readily available food source. Once bears learn about human food sources, it is not easy to recondition them to the wild and this can lead to conflicts between bears and people. It is against the law to feed bear, deer and moose.

During midsummer and dry conditions, the black bear’s natural foods are much more difficult to find. DEC Wildlife and Law Enforcement staff respond with technical advice as quickly as possible but local residents and visitors are responsible for preventing bears from gaining access to food items such as bird food, garbage and unattended coolers.

Bear in GrassBlack bears are generally timid and avoid people but if allowed access to human foods, chronic problems can develop. It is against DEC regulations to directly or indirectly feed bears and people who feed bears, intentionally or otherwise, are doing bears a great disservice. Once a bear learns to get food from people, it can be difficult to change the animal’s behavior. Bears are vulnerable to motor vehicle collisions in populated areas. In addition, if behaviors reach certain thresholds, in order to protect public safety, DEC biologists may determine it necessary to euthanize an offending bear. It is always a last resort to take a bear.

Once a bear becomes a problem, people often request that the bear be moved. Bear relocations can work if the bear isn’t solely feeding from human sources. Relocating bears is extremely time consuming and does not solve the overriding problem if people are feeding them. Bears are extremely mobile and have an excellent sense of smell and homing abilities and may return to the original capture site or start a new problem where there was none. If food attractants are not managed correctly new bears will be quickly attracted and the problem will persist. The key to preventing or solving most problems between bears and people is to eliminate the artificial food sources provided by people.

New Yorkers can help by following these guidelines:

  • When camping, keep food out of sight and secured in a vehicle if one is available. Hang food and garbage from a tree, out of reach (8 feet or higher). Also, keep picnic tables, utensils, fireplaces and the area around them clean. Do not leave coolers unattended.
  • Do not feed birds through the summer. Birds don’t really need supplemental food this time of year when their natural food is most abundant.
  • Dispose of garbage as frequently as possible. Store it in clean, secure containers (top-latched, tied or chained). Double bag meat scraps in a zip lock bag. Use ammonia soaked rags inside the garbage bag before closing. Tie off garbage bag before placing in container.
  • Do not leave dirty diapers or diaper pails outside.
  • If you live in an area frequented by bears, periodically disinfect or scrub garbage cans with Lysol, ammonia or bleach & water, store your garbage cans in a secure place such as a garage, cellar or a bear-resistant container, instead of a porch if possible.
  • If your garbage is picked up at the curb, put the garbage out just before the scheduled pickup or place it in a roadside bear-resistant container. Don’t put garbage out the night before pick-up at the curb.
  • Feed pets and store foods indoors. If you must feed outdoors, give only enough food for one feeding, take in all uneaten food and dishes before dark.
  • Remember that the smell of cooked foods may attract wandering bears closer to your house. Clean up after your picnic or barbecue. Keep barbeque grills as clean as possible and after they cool down store them inside. Do not overlook cleaning the grease trap.
  • Don’t add meat scraps, bones or melon rinds to your compost pile.
  • Don’t leave food visible for bears to see in through windows. Close blinds if necessary.
  • It’s against the law to feed a bear. If you witness bear feeding activity, report the incident to DEC Law Enforcement immediately.

Residents and tourists alike are asked to respect bears as wild animals so everyone can enjoy them with a minimum of problems.
More information: Reducing Human-Bear Conflicts

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Adirondacks: Fourth of July Holiday Weekend Notice

July 3rd, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoThe Adirondacks are open for summer recreation, come and enjoy all that our lands and waters have to offer! Please be advised of the following conditions and prepare for them to ensure a safe and enjoyable outdoor recreational experience. This information focuses on the High Peaks Region, for more information or for information on other areas in the Adirondacks visit the DEC trail information web pages at: Adirondack Trail Information

ADIRONDACK BACKCOUNTRY VISITORS

If you are recreating in the Adirondacks this Fourth of July Holiday weekend, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation asks that you be aware of the following:

HIGH USAGE LEVELS: Visitors to the Adirondacks should expect to encounter more people on the water and trails this holiday weekend. Popular campgrounds, trailhead parking lots, boat launch sites and interior campsites will likely fill to capacity. The Eastern High Peaks may reach capacity by Thursday. Plan accordingly and seek recreational opportunities in other less used areas of the Adirondack Forest Preserve.

ESSEX CHAIN LAKES: 22 designated tent sites are currently available the area around the Essex Chain Lakes. Thirteen designated along the shores of the waters of the complex require a free permit. Campers must call 518-582-2000 or visit the Adirondack Interpretive Center facility at 5922 State Route 28N in Newcomb, NY, to reserve a tent site. Campers can pick up their reserved permit at the AIC facility between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. any day of the week. See the Essex Chain Lakes Complex web page for more information on camping and other outdoor recreational opportunities in this area.

POOR MAN’S DOWNHILL SHUTTLE BUS: The Town of Wilmington will operate a shuttle bus for mountain bikers on Sunday July 6, between 1 pm and 4 pm. The shuttle will take mountain bikers from the downhill trailhead off Route 86 to the uphill trailhead off Route 431. The Poor Man’s Downhill is a multi-use trail on the northeast side of Whiteface Mountain. The trail begins just below the toll booth for the Whiteface Mountain Veteran’s Memorial Highway and ends 1,150 feet lower and nearly 3 miles away in the hamlet of Wilmington.

MUDDY & WET TRAILS: Mud and water will be present on all trails. Trails along water may be flooded. Wear waterproof footwear and gaiters and walk through – not around – mud and water to prevent eroding and widening the trail.

BEAR RESISTANT CANISTERS: Regulation requires the use of bear-resistant canisters by overnight users in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness between April 1 and November 30. NYSDEC encourages the use of bear resistant canisters throughout the Adirondacks.

OTHER BEAR AVOIDANCE TIPS

  • Store all food, toiletries and garbage in bear-resistant canisters.
  • Outside the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness, if you don’t have a bear canister, hang food. Store all food, toiletries and garbage in the hang bag. Use a 75 ft. (25 m) long dark- colored cord. Hang the bag 15 ft (5 m) above the ground and at least 10 ft (3 m) away from trees.
  • Keep food in bear-resistant canister or food hangs at all times – take down only what is needed for cooking and eating.
  • Never leave food unattended unless it is in a bear-resistant canister or in a food hang.
  • Cook early, no later than 5 p.m., and never cook or eat in your sleeping area.

BITING INSECTS: Black Flies, Mosquitoes, Deer Flies and/or Midges (No-see-ums) are everywhere. Follow these steps to minimize the nuisance of biting insects:

  • Wear light colored clothing, long sleeve shirts and long pants;
  • Tuck shirts into pants, the bottom of pant legs into socks and button sleeves at the wrist;
  • Wear a headnet when insects are thick and use an insect repellant with DEET.

Visit the Adirondack Trail Information web page for current weather forecasts, regulations, safety tips, trail conditions, and more.

Enjoy your visit to the Adirondacks!
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

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Adirondack Backcountry Visitors – Memorial Weekend Information

May 22nd, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

DEC Trail MarkerIf you are planning to recreate in the Adirondacks this Memorial Day Weekend, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation asks you to please remember the following:

FIRE DANGER: Low. Campfires are prohibited in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness.

HIGH USAGE LEVELS: Visitors to the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness should be aware that trailhead parking lots and interior campsites will often fill to capacity on Memorial Day weekend. Please plan accordingly and seek backcountry recreation opportunities in other areas.

TRAIL CONDITIONS: Trails are wet and muddy. Wear waterproof footwear and gaiters. Walk through, not around, mud and water on trails to avoid further widening and eroding trails.

MUDDY TRAIL ADVISORY: Hikers are advised to avoid trails above 3000 feet to protect the trails and surrounding vegetation which are very vulnerable at this time of year. Hikers can cause severe erosion of trails and significant damage to vegetation. Steep, wet and muddy trails are also very slippery. Hikers are asked use low and mid-elevation trails at this time.

BEAR RESISTANT CANISTERS: Regulation requires the use of bear-resistant canisters by overnight users in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness between April 1 and November 30. All food, toiletries and garbage must be stored in the bear resistant canisters at all times. DEC encourages the use of bear resistant canisters throughout the Adirondacks.

ROADS: Due to the harsh winter and washouts caused by heavy rains this spring some roads remain closed. Roads that are open may be rough and muddy – use caution. Pickup trucks, SUVs and other high axle vehicles are recommended – four wheel drive vehicles will serve even better. Corey’s Road is open and the Elk Lake Road is open beyond the Clear Pond Gate. South Meadow Lane remains closed.

BITING INSECTS: The “Bug Season” has begun in the Adirondack. Back flies are present almost everywhere; mosquitoes & ticks may be found in many locations. Follow these steps to minimize the nuisance of biting insects:

  • Wear light colored clothing, long sleeve shirts and long pants;
  • Tuck shirts into pants, the bottom of pant legs into socks and button sleeves at the wrist;
  • Wear a headnet when insects are thick and use an insect repellant with DEET.

SUMMITS: Conditions on summits are more extreme – cooler temperatures, stronger winds and possibly snow and ice.

WATER LEVELS & TEMPERATURES: Water levels are at or above average spring high levels and water temperatures remain cold. Although Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs, aka life jackets) are not required at his time, paddlers and boaters are strongly encouraged to wear PFDs at all times while on the water. Children under age 12 are required to wear a PFD at all times while on the water. Strong currents and cold water can quickly cause a person without a PFD to lose their ability to keep their head above water.

Visit the website for current weather forecasts, regulations, safety tips, trail conditions, and more: Adirondack Trail Information

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

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2014 Victoria Day Holiday Weekend Information

May 15th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

GREETINGS TO OUR CANADIAN FRIENDS
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

If you are planning to recreate in the Adirondacks this Victoria Day Weekend the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation wants you to be know the following:

FIRE DANGER: Low

CAMPGROUNDS: The Saranac Lake Islands Campground is not open this weekend. It will open on Friday, May 23. All other DEC campgrounds are open for the season.

ROADS: Corey’s Road is open to public motorized traffic, but South Meadow Lane and the Clear Pond Gate on Elk Lake Road remain closed.

BOAT LAUNCHES: The Second Pond Boat Launch accessing the Saranac Lakes Chain remains closed for construction this weekend. It will open on Friday, May 23. Most other DEC boat launches are open at this time.

WATER CONDITIONS: Water levels are average level for spring but water temperatures remain cold. Paddlers and boaters are strongly encouraged to wear Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs, aka life jackets) at all times while on the water.

HIGH USAGE LEVELS: Visitors to the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness should be aware that trailhead parking lots and interior campsites will often fill to capacity on Victoria Day weekend. Please plan accordingly and seek backcountry recreation in other areas of the Adirondacks.

MUDDY TRAIL ADVISORY: Hikers are advised to avoid trails above 3,000 feet to protect the trails and surrounding vegetation which are very vulnerable at this time of year. Hikers can cause severe erosion of trails and significant damage to vegetation. Steep, wet and muddy trails are also very slippery. Hikers are asked use low and mid-elevation trails at this time.

BEAR RESISTANT CANISTERS: Regulation requires the use of bear-resistant canisters by overnight users in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness between April 1 and November 30. NYSDEC encourages the use of bear resistant canisters throughout the Adirondacks.

BITING INSECTS: Black Flies & Mosquitoes are present in the lower elevations. Take steps to minimize the nuisance of biting insects:

  • Wear light colored clothing.
  • Wear long sleeve shirts and long pants, and tuck shirts into pants.
  • Button or rubber band sleeves at the wrist.
  • Tuck the bottom of pant legs into your socks.
  • Pack a headnet to wear when insects are thick.
  • Use an insect repellant with DEET, follow label directions.

ROCK CLIMBING ROUTE CLOSURES: Due to nesting Peregrine Falcons:

  • Chapel Pond – All climbing routes on Lower and Upper Washbowl Cliffs are closed.
  • Wilmington Notch – All routes on Moss Cliff are closed.
  • Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain – All climbing routes on the Main Face are closed, except for the climbing routes between and including “Opposition” and “A Womb with a View”.

Visit the Adirondack Trail Information web page for current weather forecasts, regulations, safety tips, trail conditions and more.

Enjoy your visit to the Adirondacks!

Nous vous souhaitons un séjour agréable dans les Adirondacks!
Informations en français (PDF)

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

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Garden Parking and Hiker Shuttle Schedule

May 15th, 2014 · No Comments ·

This is the second-busiest and trailhead in the Adirondacks accessing the High Peaks Wilderness. The lot is filled most of the summer so hikers should prepare for using the shuttle for access.

Now Operating for 2014 Hiking Season, a fee of $7.00 (Canadian @ current exchange rate) per day for parking in The Garden Lot.

This daily fee will continue through the month of October.

An attendant will be at the Garden Lot from 1:00pm until 7:00pm on Fridays and from 7:00am until 7:00pm on Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays during this period.

Town Employees and DEC Rangers will monitor the lot during the week.

PLEASE PAY ON WAY OUT

A sign at the corner of Market and Adirondack Streets will indicate when the Garden Lot is closed.

The hiker-shuttle will operate from the Southwest corner of Marcy Field, off Route 73, when the Garden Parking is full. Fri, Sat, and Sun only.

Generally, the shuttle begins operation two holiday weekends in May (Victoria Day, Memorial Day). Daily operation begins last weekend in June and continues through Columbus Weekend mid-October.

The Shuttle will NORMALLY leave Marcy Field parking lot every 1/2 hour and on the hour.

A fee of $5.00 American (Canadian @ current exchange rate) will be charged per person for a round trip.

Information and Rates are as of 2014. Courtesy of Town of Keene.

More Info:

Current Interior Conditions in the Adirondack High Peaks Region

Special Rules – High Peaks Wilderness

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DEC Alert Hikers of Muddy Conditions in the High Peaks

May 8th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Hikers Should Temporarily Avoid High Elevation Trails in the Adirondacks

NYSDEC LogoIt is the start of a new season of outdoor hiking and recreation on public lands in the Adirondacks and the New York State Departmentof Environmental Conservation (DEC) urges hikers to be cautious and postpone hikes on trails above 3,000 feetuntil early June, the agency announced today.

DEC is asking hikers to avoid trails above 3,000 feet, particularly high elevation trails in the Dix, Giant and High Peaks Wilderness Areas in the northern Adirondacks, due to muddy conditions and the potential damage hiking can cause to vegetation and soft ground.

Hikers are advised to only use trails at lower elevations during the spring mud season to avoid damaging natural resources and to promote safety. Lower trails usually dry soon after snowmelt and are on less erosive soils than the higher peaks.

DEC asks hikers to avoid the following trails:

  • High Peaks Wilderness Area – all trails above 3,000 feet; where wet, muddy, snow conditions still prevail, specifically: Algonquin, Colden, Feldspar, Gothics, Indian Pass, Lake Arnold Cross-Over, Marcy, Marcy Dam – Avalanche – Lake Colden which is extremely wet, Phelps Trail above John Brook Lodge, Range Trail, Skylight, Wright and all “trail-less” peaks.
  • Dix Mountain Wilderness Area – all trails above Elk Lake and Round Pond
  • Giant Mountain Wilderness Area – all trails above Giant’s Washbowl, “the Cobbles,” and Owls Head.

DEC suggests the following alternative trails for hiking, subject to weather conditions:

High Peaks Wilderness:

  • Ampersand Mountain
  • Cascade Mountain
  • Porter Mountain from Cascade Mountain (avoid all other approaches)
  • Big Slide
  • The Brothers

Debar Mt. Wild Forest:

  • Azure Mountain

Giant Mt. Wilderness:

  • Giant’s Washbowl
  • Roaring Brook Falls
  • Hurricane Mountain Wilderness
  • The Crows

McKenzie Mt. Wilderness:

  • Baker Mountain
  • Haystack Mountain

Pharaoh Lake Wilderness Area:

  • Pharaoh Mountain

Saranac Lakes Wild Forest:

  • Panther Mountain
  • Scarface Mountain

DEC’s web site contains additional information on trail conditions at Adirondack Trail Information or contact the DEC ForestRangers at (518) 897-1300.

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Current Interior Conditions in the Adirondack High Peaks Region

January 23rd, 2014 · No Comments ·

Compiled on Thursday July 17, 2014

WEATHER FORECAST

Weather: This is the National Weather Service (NWS) seven-day forecast for the Marcy Dam area of the High Peaks Wilderness on Wednesday, June 11. Hikers & campers should expect and prepare for cooler and windier conditions in higher elevations, and more rain. Always check current forecasts before entering the back country as the weather forecast can change.

Tonight: Mostly clear, with a low around 45. West wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening.
Friday: Sunny, with a high near 73. Calm wind becoming southwest around 6 mph in the afternoon.
Friday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 48. North wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening.
Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 78. Calm wind becoming southwest 5 to 8 mph in the morning.
Saturday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 49. Light south wind.
Sunday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 76. South wind around 6 mph.
Sunday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 53. South wind around 6 mph.
Monday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 79. South wind around 6 mph.
Monday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 58. South wind around 6 mph.
Tuesday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 82. Southwest wind around 7 mph.
Tuesday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 60. Southwest wind around 8 mph.
Wednesday: 30% chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 82. Southwest wind around 8 mph.

Latest Regional Forecast: National Weather Service – BTV

INTERIOR CONDITIONS

Wilderness conditions can change suddenly. While believed accurate, weather conditions may change at any time. All users should plan accordingly, including bringing flashlight, first aid equipment, extra food, plenty of water and clothing. Weather conditions may alter your plans; you should be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods before entering the back country.

Fire Danger: MODERATE. Be cautious with campfires. Campfires and wood burning stoves are prohibited in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness.

Trail Conditions: Scattered thunderstorms have kept trails wet and muddy in low areas and along waters. Wear gaiters and appropriate footwear. Walk through not around wet and muddy areas to avoid further eroding and widening trails.

Bear Resistant Canisters: The use of bear-resistant canisters is required for all overnight users in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness and highly recommended in all other locations. Nuisance bear activity has been reported in the Lake Colden area. All food, toiletries and garbage must be stored in a bear-resistant canister.

Biting Insects: Mosquitoes, Deer Flies and Midges (No-see-ums) are present in the backcountry. Minimize the nuisance of biting insects: wear light colored clothing, long sleeve shirts and long pants; tuck shirts into pants, tuck pant legs into socks and button or rubber band sleeves at the wrist; pack a headnet to wear when insects are thick; and use an insect repellant with DEET, follow label directions.

Summits: Expect and prepare for cooler temperatures and stronger winds. Sight distance will be limited, sometimes significantly, when clouds cover the summits.

Dogs on Leash: Dog owners are reminded that dogs must be leashed in the Eastern Zone of the High Peaks when on trails, at primitive tent sites, at lean-to sites, everywhere above 4,000 feet, or at other areas where the public congregates. It is recommended dogs be kept leashed in most areas for the safety of your dog, the protection of wildlife and as a courtesy to fellow hikers.

NOTE: Fires are prohibited in Eastern High Peaks Wilderness Zone

NOTE: Group size regulations are in effect throughout the High Peaks Wilderness. Group size for overnight campers is 8 or less and for day use it is 15 or less.

Be Prepared Before Entering the Back Country:

Check (before entering the backcountry)

  • Local Forest Ranger for current information.
  • Current weather conditions and short-term forecast

Wear

  • Appropriate outer wear and foot wear
  • Layers of non-cotton clothes

Carry

  • Map and compass and know how to use them and use them!
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Plenty of food and water

Pack

  • Extra clothes and socks
  • Rain gear
  • Ensolite pad to rest on and insulate your body from cold surfaces
  • Bivy sack or space blankets for extra warmth

Always inform someone of your itinerary and when you expect to return

Please be aware that accessing the Forest Preserve through the rest areas is prohibited. In accordance with New York State Regulation §156.3(d), vehicles may not be left unattended in the rest area, unless the operator or passenger is within the rest area. Also parking of vehicles for longer than three hours during the hours of darkness is not permitted in accordance with §156.3(c).

NOTICES

Rock Climbing Route Closures: All rock climbing routes on Moss Cliff in the Wilmington Notch are now open. Rock climbing routes on the Upper Washbowl Cliffs near Chapel Pond are closed to allow for peregrine falcons to nest undisturbed. All climbing routes on Lower Washbowl Cliffs are open. Climbers on the Diagonal Area of Wallface are reporting being dived at by peregrine falcons. Climbers should avoid this area while DEC seeks to confirm the location of the nest site.

Garden Parking Area: The Garden parking area is open and the Town of Keene is collecting parking fees. The shuttle will be running from the alternate parking area near Marcy Field off Route 73.
Garden Parking and Hiker Shuttle Schedule

Poor Man’s Downhill Shuttle Bus: The Town of Wilmington will operate a shuttle bus for mountain bikers on Sunday July 20, between 1 pm and 4 pm. The shuttle will take mountain bikers from the downhill trailhead off Route 86 to the uphill trailhead off Route 431. The Poor Man’s Downhill is a multi-use trail on the northeast side of Whiteface Mountain. The trail begins just below the toll booth for the Whiteface Mountain Veteran’s Memorial Highway and ends 1,150 feet lower and nearly 3 miles away in the hamlet of Wilmington.

Marshall and Other Trail-less Peaks: Many of the herd paths found on Marshall and some of the other trail-less peaks meander around the slopes of the mountain without reaching the peak. Those climbing these peaks should navigate with a map and compass rather than follow the paths created by others.

East River Trail is Open: A new bridge has been constructed on the East River Trail over the Hudson River to access Mt. Adams and the Opalescent River.

Duck Hole-Henderson Lake Trail: A new bridge has been constructed over Roaring Brook near Duck Hole.

Trap Dike: Fixed ropes, harnesses and other equipment are often abandoned in the Trap Dike. Due to the age, weatherizing and wearing of these materials they are unsafe and should never be used.

Closed Campsite: The designated campsite on Big Slide Mountain Brook in Johns Brook Valley near the intersection with the Phelps Trail has been permanently closed due to site degradation. Other designated campsites are located across from the Howard Lean-to and just past Johns Brook Lodge. Signs on the hiking trail direct hikers to these sites.

Bradley Pond Trail: The first foot bridge on the Bradley Pond Trail has been dropped and is unusable. The stream can be forded /rock hopped most of time on the downstream side of the bridge site.

Klondike Trail: The bridge over South Meadow Brook on the Klondike Trail has been replaced. The trail can now be accessed directly from the end of South Meadow Road.

Hurricane Mountain Trails: Some areas on the trail from Route 9N are flooded due to beaver activity, reroutes have been developed to get around those areas.

Northville-Placid Trail: The trail contains a large area of blowdown near the Seward Lean-to. A detour around the blowdown has been marked with pink flagging.

Marcy Brook Foot Bridge: A new bridge has been constructed over Marcy Brook. It is located approximately 200 feet below Marcy Dam, upstream from the low water crossing that had been in use since Hurricane Irene washed away the old bridge over Marcy Dam.

Southside Trail: DEC has closed the Southside Trail from the Garden Trailhead to John’s Brook Outpost and is not maintaining it at this time.

Cold Brook Trail: DEC has closed the Cold Brook Trail between Lake Colden and Indian Pass and is not maintaining it at this time.

Deer Brook Trail: The low water route through the Deer Brook Flume on this trail to Snow Mountain remains impassable due to severe erosion.

Courtesy of DEC Region 5

MORE INFO:

Adirondack High Peaks Wilderness Hiking and Camping Rules

Adirondack Snow Conditions and Resources

Adirondack Trail Information – NYSDEC

Adirondack Trails High Peaks Region – The Essential Trail Guide

Bear Resistant Canister Regulation – NYSDEC

Garden Parking and Shuttle Schedule

Detailed Weather Forecast – Plattsburgh, Lake Placid, Tupper Lake, Old Forge, Lake George

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