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Adirondack Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Highlights: 10/05-10/11/15

October 14th, 2015 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

“DEC Forest Rangers’ knowledge of first aid, land navigation and technical rescue techniques are often critical to the success of their missions,” said Acting DEC Commissioner Marc Gerstman. “Search and rescue missions often require Rangers to function in remote wilderness areas from rugged mountainous peaks to white-water rivers, and through vast forest areas from spruce-fir thicket to open hardwoods.”


Recent missions carried out by DEC Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks include:

Essex County
Town of Jay – Private Land
Lost Individual: On October 6, 2015 at 9:39 a.m. Essex County 911 transferred a call to DEC Ray Brook Dispatch reporting a lost 60-year-old woman from Jay, NY. The woman followed her dog into a wooded area on private property and could not find her way out. Essex County 911 provided the woman’s GPS coordinates to DEC Dispatch. A DEC Forest Ranger responded and located the woman at 10:58 a.m. in good condition. The Ranger escorted her back to her vehicle.

Town of Keene – Hurricane Mountain Primitive Area
Lost Hikers: On October 10, 2015 at 6:03 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a request for assistance from two hikers who had gone off trail coming down Weston Mountain to Crow Clearing. Essex County 911 obtained GPS coordinates which placed the 34-year-old woman and 28-year-old man, both from Chicago, IL approximately 30-40 yards off trail. DEC Forest Rangers responded to Crow Clearing and headed in the hikers direction, based on the coordinates. Rangers located the pair on the trail at 7:28 p.m., gave them food and water and escorted them back to the trailhead. The incident concluded 8:30 p.m.

Town of Keene – High Peaks Wilderness
Overdue Hikers: On October 10, 2015 at 10:22 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from a hiker reporting that two members of his hiking party, a 22-year-old woman and 24-year-old man, both from Buffalo, NY had not returned from hiking Gothics. A DEC Forest Ranger responded to the Garden parking lot and interviewed the reporting party. Rangers determined it would be best to start searching for the subjects at first light the following morning. At 6:30 a.m., three Forest Rangers began searching for the missing hikers via the Garden parking lot. Dispatch received a call from the reporting party at 9:50 a.m. that the missing hikers found their way out and returned to the Wilmington Notch Campground where they were staying. Forest Rangers aborted their search efforts after being notified.

Town of North Elba – High Peaks Wilderness
Injured Hiker: On October 11, 2015 at 4:32 p.m., DEC Ray Brook received a call from a hiker reporting that a 31-year-old female member of her hiking party sustained a lower leg injury. It happened during a hike from Lake Arnold, approximately one mile from Marcy Dam. Members of the hiking party assisted the injured woman to Marcy Dam. Ray Brook Dispatch contacted the Marcy Dam caretaker to meet the party and assist in transporting her to the outpost, while a DEC Forest Ranger responded to Marcy Dam on a Utility Terrain Vehicle. The Ranger transported the woman back to her vehicle where she said she would seek medical attention on her own. The incident concluded at 7:00 p.m.

Franklin County
Town of Brighton – St. Regis Canoe Area
Lost Hunter: On October 10, 2015 at 4:30 p.m., campus safety at Paul Smith’s College contacted DEC Ray Brook Dispatch reporting a lost student. The 26-year-old man from Elma, NY went hunting off Keese Mills Rd. near the college and did not return. DEC Forest Rangers responded to the area and located the man’s vehicle. Dispatch advised the hunter to call Franklin County 911 to obtain coordinates from his phone. The coordinates provided were inaccurate and Rangers determined the man was farther away than anticipated. Rangers used shouting and gun shots to locate the man at 9:36 p.m. and then escorted him to his vehicle. The incident concluded at 10:30 p.m.

Herkimer County
Town of Webb – Fulton Chain Wild Forest
Injured Hiker: On October 10, 2015 at 2:12 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from Herkimer County 911 requesting assistance for a 54-year-old woman from Syracuse, NY with a leg injury on Bald Mountain. DEC Forest Rangers arrived on scene and headed up the mountain along with Webb Police and the Old Forge Fire and Rescue Squad. They packaged the woman at the summit and carried her down to the trailhead. Once at the trailhead she told Rangers she would seek medical attention on her own. The incident concluded at 4:46 p.m.

Warren County
Town of Bolton – Cat and Thomas Mountain Preserve Conservation Easement Lands
Lost Hikers: On October 7, 2015 at 5:55 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call reporting a 59-year-old man and a 49-year-old woman, both from Sarasota, FL became disoriented while hiking the Cat and Thomas Mountain Preserve Trail and could not determine which trail to take back to the trailhead. The hikers called 911 requesting assistance. A DEC Forest Ranger responded to the trailhead on Valley Woods Road in Bolton Landing, located the man and woman at 9:00 p.m., and escorted them back to the trailhead by 10:30 p.m.

Town of Bolton – Lake George Wild Forest
Lost Hikers: On October 9, 2015 at 11:44 a.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from a hiker and his companion reporting they were lost on the South Trail, 5th Point Peak, in the Tongue Mountain Range. The men, both 29, one from Saratoga Springs, NY and the other from Troy, NY became disoriented that morning after camping on 5th Peak. Warren County 911 obtained GPS coordinates that placed the men close to the shoreline of Lake George. DEC Forest Rangers used a boat from Green Island to travel up Lake George to their location. The Rangers located the men at 1:58 p.m. in good condition and transported them to Green Island by boat. Rangers then gave the men a ride from a Forest Ranger Patrol vehicle back to their own vehicle parked at the 5th Peak trailhead. The incident concluded at 3:00 p.m.

Washington County
Town of Fort Ann – Lake George Wild Forest
Lost Hikers: On October 11, 2015 at 6:30 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from Washington County 911 reporting two hikers lost near Inman Pond. Two DEC Forest Rangers responded to the Inman Pond Trailhead. At 7:00 p.m. the 64-year-old man from Charlton, NY and the 61-year-old woman from Saratoga Springs, NY contacted DEC Ray Brook Dispatch via cell phone. Dispatch instructed the lost hikers on how to get coordinates from their iPhone and then relayed those coordinates to the Forest Rangers at the trailhead. At approximately 7:47 p.m., Forest Rangers located the hikers and escorted them back to the trailhead without further incident.

Town of Fort Ann – Lake George Wild Forest
Injured Hiker: On October 12, 2015 at 2:37 p.m., DEC Ray Brook received a call from a passing hiker reporting an injured female hiker approximately 1/2 mile from the summit of Sleeping Beauty. DEC Forest Rangers responded to the Dacy Clearing Parking area. The West Ft. Ann Fire and Rescue Squad also responded and set up a staging area at the Upper Hogtown parking area. Rangers located the 48-year-old woman from Gansevoort, NY at 3:39 p.m. and provided her with first aid for the injury. They escorted her out to the trailhead where Fort Ann EMS assessed her and she declined any additional medical treatment. The incident concluded at 4:31 p.m.

Town of Fort Ann – Lake George Wild Forest
Injured Hiker: On October 12, 2015 at 4:00 p.m., DEC Forest Rangers responded to a report of a 46-year-old woman from Clifton Park, NY with a lower leg injury along the Sleeping Beauty trail system. Rangers assessed the woman and provided first aid before escorting her out to the trailhead where the Fort Ann EMS assessed her further. The woman then declined any additional medical treatment. The incident concluded at 4:31 p.m.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry. Visit DEC’s Hiking Safety and Adirondack Trail Information webpages for more information.

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Adirondack Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Highlights: 9/28-10/4/15

October 6th, 2015 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

“DEC Forest Rangers’ knowledge of first aid, land navigation and technical rescue techniques are often critical to the success of their missions,” said Acting DEC Commissioner Marc Gerstman. “Search and rescue missions often require Rangers to function in remote wilderness areas from rugged mountainous peaks to white-water rivers, and through vast forest areas from spruce-fir thicket to open hardwoods.”


Recent missions carried out by DEC Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks include:

Essex County
Town of North Elba – High Peaks Wilderness
Injured Hiker: On October 2, 2015 at 6:40 p.m., the AuSable Club (Adirondack Mountain Reserve) caretaker contacted DEC Ray Brook Dispatch reporting an injured hiker on the summit of Gothics. The 30-year-old man from Gansevoort, NY slipped and sustained a non-weight bearing leg injury. Ray Brook Dispatch established cell phone voice and text contact with the man’s hiking party at 6:45 p.m. and advised them to keep the injured hiker warm in a sleeping bag. The hikers set up their tent on the summit behind a sheltered rock. DEC determined a carryout was not possible due to the ladders used to access Gothics, so New York State Police Aviation planned to respond Saturday morning as soon as the cloud cover cleared the summit.

At 9:27 a.m. the following morning, State Police Aviation, with two DEC Forest Rangers on board, attempted a hoist rescue. Wind gusts of up to 60 knots (70 mph) prohibited the helicopter from approaching the summit to land or to lower a Forest Ranger to the ground. Aviation determined that due to continued high winds, a repeat attempt could not be made. The hikers told dispatch they would start walking out on their own. A Forest Ranger who had already started into Gothics met the injured party on the western edge of the summit at noon. The two Forest Rangers who had attempted to hoist operation also hiked in and walked out with the subjects. The injured hiker refused further medical care or rescue transport. The hikers and Forest Ranger personnel returned to the Adirondack Mountain Reserve at 3:00 p.m.

Town of North Elba – High Peaks Wilderness
Injured hiker: On October 3, 2015 at 4:14 p.m., the Lake Colden interior outpost caretaker contacted DEC Ray Brook Dispatch via radio reporting a member of a hiking party had fallen twice and sustained a non-weight bearing lower leg injury. The 29-year-old woman was resting at the McNaughton lean-to. The Colden caretaker reached the injured hiker at 4:48 p.m. and confirmed the injury. The caretaker and members of the hiking party escorted the injured woman back to the Lake Colden interior outpost. DEC Forest Rangers confirmed that New York State Police Aviation was unavailable until morning. The injured hiker stayed at the Lake Colden interior outpost for the night. At 10:06 a.m., NYSP Aviation and one Forest Ranger hoisted the woman from the outpost and transferred her to Marcy Field. They released her to Keene Valley EMS, which transferred her to Elizabethtown Hospital for further medical treatment.

Franklin County
Town of Waverly – Debar Mountain Wild Forest
Injured hiker: On October 4, 2015 at 1:32 p.m., DEC Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from a hiker reporting she had come across an injured female hiker approximately 25 minutes up the Azure Mountain trail. The 51-year-old woman slipped and fell while descending the summit. A DEC Forest Ranger responded along with St. Regis Falls EMS. The Forest Ranger located the woman and escorted her out to the trailhead at 3:21 p.m. EMS transported her to Adirondack Medical Center in Saranac Lake.

Hamilton County
Town of Inlet – Moose River Plains Wild Forest
Lost Hiker: On October 1, 2015 at 3:50 p.m., Herkimer County 911 contacted DEC Ray Brook Dispatch reporting that they had received information from a third party about a 41-year-old woman from Barneveld, NY lost on Black Bear Mountain. The woman contacted a friend to report she was lost. Herkimer County 911 made follow-up calls to the hiker, but could not reach her. DEC Forest Rangers responded to Black Bear Mountain and arrived at 4:30 p.m. They began searching the main trails and reached the summit without finding the woman. Forest Rangers then decided to search the outlying herd paths and ski trails. They located the woman at 5:15 p.m. in good condition on one of the ski trails. She told Rangers she had hiked to the summit of Black Bear Mountain and on her decent veered off trail onto a herd path. This path lead her southeast toward an old ski trail. She tried to follow the old ski trail markers but ended up going in circles and returned to the ski trail every time. Rangers located her approximately 1.5 miles from Route 28 and escorted her down the old ski trail and back to the trailhead. The incident concluded at 6:17 p.m.

Town of Inlet – Moose River Plains Wild Forest
Overdue Hunter: On October 4, 2015 at 9:19 p.m., Herkimer County 911 contacted DEC Ray Brook Dispatch regarding a call requesting assistance to locate an overdue hunter. The 64-year-old man from West Monroe, NY with known medical issues was expected to return to his campsite at noon. When the hunter did not return after dark, a member of his camping party went into the town of Inlet to call 911. DEC Forest Rangers responded. After interviewing the reporting party, they heard what was believed to be a gunshot at approximately 7:30 p.m. Forest Rangers immediately drove to the closest high point of land located in the targeted search area and fired three shots into the sky. There was an immediate reply when someone yelled back. They located the hunter at 12:40 a.m. in good condition, approximately 200 yards from there the Forest Rangers had stopped. They escorted the man back to his campsite.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry. Visit DEC’s Hiking Safety and Adirondack Trail Information webpages for more information.

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Adirondack Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Highlights: 11/17-11/23/14

November 25th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

“DEC Forest Rangers’ knowledge of first aid, land navigation and technical rescue techniques are often critical to the success of their missions,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens. “Search and rescue missions often require Rangers to function in remote wilderness areas from rugged mountainous peaks to white-water rivers, and through vast forest areas from spruce-fir thicket to open hardwoods.”


Recent missions carried out by DEC Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks include:

St. Lawrence County
Boreal Wild Forest, Town of Colton
Lost Hiker: On November 19, 2014 at 7:37 p.m., DEC Central Dispatch received a call from St. Lawrence County 911 requesting assistance from DEC Forest Rangers in locating a lost hunter. A 21-year-old male from Potsdam, NY had entered the woods near the old Backwoods Inn on Route 56 in Colton and was last seen at 1:30 p.m. He did not show up at the designated time to meet his party. Two Forest Rangers responded to the location on Route 56, and quickly located the hunter by voice contact. The Forest Rangers escorted him back to where he entered the woods. He was evaluated by Colton Emergency Medical Services, and released to his party at 8:30 p.m. New York State Police and DEC Environmental Conservation Officers provided additional assistance.

Essex County
High Peaks Wilderness, Town of North Elba
Distressed Hiker: On November 21, 2014 at 4:20 p.m., DEC Central Dispatch received a call from a hiker advising that his companion, a 26-year-old female from Jericho, Vermont needed assistance on Algonquin Mountain. She had fallen into a river, was wet and it was turning colder. Two Forest Rangers on snowmobiles proceeded up the old Algonquin Trail while a third Forest Ranger set out on foot from the ADK Loj to Algonquin Junction. The woman was located half-way up the Algonquin Trail at 6:30 p.m. Rangers provided her with water and dry gloves and transported her back to ADK Loj by snowmobile, arriving at the Loj at 7:30 p.m. Her hiking companions met her with dry clothes. She declined medical attention on-site but was encouraged to seek a medical evaluation on her own. Her hiking party advised they would bring her to Adirondack Medical Center for treatment.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry. Visit DEC’s Hiking Safety and Adirondack Trail Information web for more information.

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Adirondack Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Highlights: 10/20-10/26/14

October 28th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

“DEC Forest Rangers’ knowledge of first aid, land navigation and technical rescue techniques are often critical to the success of their missions,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens. “Search and rescue missions often require Rangers to function in remote wilderness areas from rugged mountainous peaks to white-water rivers, and through vast forest areas from spruce-fir thicket to open hardwoods.”

Recent missions carried out by DEC Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks include:

Essex County
High Peaks Wilderness, Town of North Elba
Distressed Hiker: On October 25, 2014 at 12:21 p.m., DEC Forest Rangers rescued a 47-year-old man from Clinton, NY who called dispatch saying he was in medical distress. The hiker was half way up Mount Marcy when he began to develop symptoms. DEC Forest Rangers responded and evaluated the man. Crews performed life saving measures on scene. Several Forest Rangers assisted in carrying the man down Mount Marcy to a waiting helicopter. He was airlifted from the scene to Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital in Plattsburgh at 3:30 p.m.

Hamilton County
Blue Ridge Wilderness, Town of Indian Lake
Lost Hunter: On October 25, 2014 at 6:40 p.m., DEC Dispatch in Ray Brook received a call from an individual saying that his hunting companion was overdue from hiking Sawyer Mountain. The 67 year-old man from Port Republic, NJ was supposed to return before dark. DEC Forest Rangers located the hunter at 1:10 a.m. on the backside of Sprague Pond and transported him across the pond and out to his vehicle at 3:22 a.m.

Pigeon Lake Wilderness, Town of Inlet
Stranded Boaters: On October 25, 2014 at 6:45 p.m., Dispatch in Ray Brook received a call from Hamilton County 911 advising of a 51-year-old man from Lafayette, NY stranded on Quaker Beach on Raquette Lake. Due to spotty cell phone service Hamilton County 911 received limited information and efforts to call the man back were unsuccessful. The Forest Ranger responded by boat to Raquette Lake and located the man and two others, a 51-year-old man from East Syracuse, NY and a 50-year-old man from Lafayette, NY on Quaker Beach. They explained their boat had broken down and due to limited cell phone coverage with Hamilton County they could not accurately convey their message for assistance. The DEC Forest Ranger gave the men a ride back to their camp at around 8:39 p.m. They retrieved their boat the next morning.

Jessup River Wild Forest, Town of Lake Pleasant
Injured Hiker: On October 26, 2014 at 1:30 p.m., a DEC Forest Ranger contacted DEC Dispatch in Ray Brook to advise he was responding to a report of an injured hiker on the Northville Placid Trail. The 63-year-old female from Yorkville, NY had been hiking north on the Northville Placid Trail and sustained a leg injury two miles up the trail. Additional Forest Rangers responded with All Terrain Vehicles. At 2:45 p.m. Forest Rangers located the woman and transported her by ATV to the trailhead. The hiker drove herself to the hospital for treatment of the injury.

Warren County
Lake George Wild Forest, Town of Lake George
Lost Hikers: On October 25, 2014 at 2:49 p.m., DEC Dispatch in Ray Brook received a call from a 23-year-old man from Syosset, NY reporting that he and his companion, a 25-year-old woman from New York City, could see Blue Trail Markers, but believed they may be on the wrong trail. After talking to the hikers, the Forest Ranger determined where they might be. He directed them to go back the way they came and he met them on the trail. The Forest Ranger picked them up with his patrol vehicle through the Thomas Mountain trail system. They were transported back to their vehicle at 5 p.m.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry. Visit DEC’s Hiking Safety and Adirondack Trail Information web for more information.

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Adirondack Forest Ranger Search and Rescue Highlights: 10/14-10/19/14

October 20th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the backcountry.

“DEC Forest Rangers’ knowledge of first aid, land navigation and technical rescue techniques are often critical to the success of their missions,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens. “Search and rescue missions often require Rangers to function in remote wilderness areas from rugged mountainous peaks to white-water rivers, and through vast forest areas from spruce-fir thicket to open hardwoods.”

Recent missions carried out by DEC Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks include:

Essex County

Giant Mountain Wilderness, Town of Elizabethtown
Lost Hikers: On October 19 at 3:15 p.m., Essex County 911 transferred a call to DEC Dispatch in Ray Brook. The hikers, a 22-year old female from Mechanicville, NY, and a 26-year old female from Wantagh, NY, had been hiking down from the Blueberry Mountain summit when they lost the trail and became disoriented. Both women stated they could see a house and hear the roadway but could not proceed down because they were at a cliff. 911 coordinates were relayed to two DEC Forest Rangers. The Rangers located the women in good condition at 5:15 p.m. at which time they proceeded to their vehicle.

High Peaks Mountain Wilderness, Town of Keene
Injured Hiker: On October 19th, 2014 at 5:50 p.m., DEC Dispatch in Ray Brook received a radio transmission from John’s Brook Loj advising that a 38-year-old male from Nutley, NY had suffered a lower leg injury as the result of a fall while hiking Big Slide. He was able to walk with some assistance from two individuals. A hiker with the group went ahead to report the incident to John’s Brook Loj. The other hikers advised they would be walking the man to John’s Brook Outpost for staging. Three DEC Forest Rangers were dispatched. The injured man and his hiking party were located at the Phelps Trail Junction at 9:28 p.m. The individuals that had assisted the man were escorted out to the Garden parking lot by DEC Forest Rangers and the injured hiker was brought to a waiting utility terrain vehicle. From there he was taken down the Southside Trail. A waiting ambulance transported him to Adirondack Medical Center in Saranac Lake, NY for treatment at 11:40 p.m.

Hamilton County

Private Lane, Town of Speculator
Lost Hunters: On October 19 at 6:15 p.m., the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office contacted DEC Dispatch in Ray Brook regarding two lost males in the town of Speculator. The men, a 59-year-old and a 36-year-old both from Gloversville, NY had become lost while muzzleloading on private property in Speculator. A DEC Environmental Conservation Officer responded to assist and attempted to attract the subjects to his siren. A DEC Forest Ranger and a Hamilton County Sheriff’s deputy located both men at 8:30 p.m. and escorted them back to their vehicle.

Warren County

Prospect Mountain, Village of Lake George
Lost Hikers: On October 17th, 2014 at 2:28 p.m., DEC Dispatch in Ray Brook received a call from a 60-year-old male from Manhasset, NY advising that he and his companion, a 46-year-old female from Locust Valley, NY were lost near the parking area of Prospect Mountain. They reported they could not find their way back to the picnic area. The couple had no hiking experience and had no hiking gear. Two DEC Rangers responded. The hikers gave DEC Dispatch in Ray Brook their coordinates off their cell phones to help identify their location. Based on these coordinates, Rangers took older trails and through voice contact located the couple. They advised the Rangers they had taken a herd path which they believed was a trail and got turned around. They were escorted out of the woods and back to their vehicle by 4:59 p.m.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry. Visit Hiking Safety and Adirondack Trail Information on DEC’s website for more information.

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DEC Announces Early Bear Hunting Seasons to Begin

September 5th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Bear Hunting Seasons Begin September 6 in Portions of Southeastern New York and September 13 in Northern New York

NYSDEC LogoUnder Governor Cuomo’s NY Open for Fishing and Hunting Initiative, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens today announced that the new 2014 early bear hunting seasons open at sunrise on Saturday, September 6, in portions of New York’s southern zone and Saturday, September 13, in the northern zone.

“Early black bear hunting seasons are an important tool for managers to control bear populations, and beginning Saturday, hunters will have a new opportunity to pursue bears in portions of the Catskills and western Hudson Valley,” said Commissioner Martens. “Opening these early seasons demonstrates Governor Cuomo’s commitment to increasing hunting opportunities here in New York State for sportsmen and women.”

Following recommendations in DEC’s recently adopted bear management plan to reduce bear populations in the region, the new early firearms bear season runs from September 6-21 in Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) 3A, 3C, 3H, 3J, 3K, 3M, 3P, 3R, 4P, and 4R. The early bowhunting season for bears will then open in all of the Southern Zone on October 1, followed by the regular firearms season beginning November 15.

Bear in GrassNew this year, DEC has also expanded bear hunting in northern New York to include WMUs 6A, 6G, 6K and 6N. In these newly opened units, bear hunting begins with bowhunting equipment only from September 13 through October 17. In the rest of northern New York (WMUs 5A, 5C, 5F, 5G, 5H, 5J, 6C, 6F, 6H, and 6J), the early firearms season begins Saturday, September 13 and continues until October 17. Muzzleloader season then opens in all northern WMUs on October 18, followed by the regular firearms season for bear on October 25.

During these early seasons, or whenever hunting in warm conditions, bear hunters should be prepared to skin and cool harvested bears as soon as possible to protect the quality of the meat. Hunters may consider skinning and quartering the bear in the field and packing out the meat in game bags.

As part of the NY Open for Fishing and Hunting Initiative, New York streamlined the hunting and fishing license structure, made it consistent for resident and non-residents, and reduced license fees. Some hunters and anglers may not be familiar with these license changes, but licensing-issuing agents are prepared to provide assistance and ensure the license buyers secure all the desired permits and privileges. Highlights of the sporting licenses changes are available on DEC’s website.

In addition, the new Hunting & Trapping regulation guides are available at all license issuing outlets, as well as on DEC’s website.

In support of the NY Open for Fishing and Hunting Initiative, this year’s budget includes $6 million in NY Works funding to support creating 50 new land and water access projects to connect hunters, anglers, bird watchers and others who enjoy the outdoors to more than 380,000 acres of existing state and easement lands that have not reached their full potential. These 50 new access projects include building new boat launches, installing new hunting blinds and building new trails and parking areas. In addition, the 2014-15 budget includes $4 million to repair the state’s fish hatcheries; and renews and allows expanded use of crossbows for hunting in New York State.

DEC regulates black bear hunting to manage populations toward levels that are acceptable to the public. Information about black bear hunting in New York, including season dates and regulations, is available on DEC’s website. Additionally, DEC’s booklet Hunting the Black Bear in New York (PDF) (937 KB), includes tips on bear hunting and proper care of harvested bears.

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Hunting or Trapping of Wild Boars in New York Now Prohibited

April 29th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

New DEC Regulation Works Toward Statewide Eradication

NYSDEC LogoA new regulation that prohibits hunting or trapping of free-ranging Eurasian boars in New York State was formally adopted state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens announced today. The regulation is designed to ensure maximum effectiveness of DEC’s statewide eradication efforts.

“Enacting a statewide regulation was important to support DEC’s ongoing work to remove this invasive species from the state and to ensure that it does not become established in the wild anywhere in New York,” said Commissioner Martens. “Eurasian boars are a great threat to natural resources, agricultural interests, and private property and public safety wherever they occur and DEC will continue to work to protect these resources and remove wild boars from the state.”

Eurasian boars were brought to North America centuries ago and wild populations numbering in the millions are now present across much of the southern U.S. In recent years, wild boar populations have been appearing in more northern states too, often as a result of escapes from enclosed shooting facilities that offer “wild boar hunts.”

Governor Cuomo signed legislation on October 21, 2013, which immediately prohibited the importation, breeding or introduction to the wild of any Eurasian Boars. Furthermore, the law prohibits possession, sale, transport or marketing of live Eurasian boars as of September 1, 2015. The new law was an essential step in the state’s efforts to prevent Eurasian boars from becoming established in the wild.

Feral SwineHowever, there are already small numbers of Eurasian boars on the landscape in New York. Since 2000, wild boars have been reported in many counties across the state, and breeding in the wild has been confirmed in at least six counties (Tioga, Cortland, Onondaga, Clinton, Sullivan and Delaware) in recent years. DEC is working closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services program to remove any Eurasian boars that are reported in New York. To date, more than 150 animals have been captured and destroyed. However, eradication is expensive, time consuming and requires a great deal of manpower.

“Hunters have offered to assist our efforts by hunting for boars wherever they occur, but experience has shown this to be counter-productive,” Martens said. “As long as swine may be pursued by hunters, there is a potential conflict with our eradication efforts. Eurasian boars often join together to form a ‘sounder,’ the name for a group of pigs that can number 20 or more individuals. Shooting individual boars as opportunities arise is ineffective as an eradication method often causes the remaining animals to disperse and be more difficult to remove.”

Hunters pursuing wild boars in locations where baited traps have been established by DEC or USDA can also undermine these costly and labor-intensive capture efforts. Shooting may remove one or two animals, but the rest of the sounder scatters and rarely comes back together as a group, thereby hampering eradication efforts. In addition to prohibiting take of free-ranging swine by hunters, the new regulation prohibits anyone from disturbing traps set for wild boars or otherwise interfering with Eurasian boar eradication activities. Hunting wild boar is still allowed at enclosed hunting preserves until September 1, 2015.

The regulation does provide necessary exceptions for state and federal wildlife agencies, law enforcement agencies, and others who are authorized by DEC to take Eurasian boar to alleviate nuisance, property damage, or threats to public health or welfare.

Anyone who observes a Eurasian boar (dead or alive) in the wild in New York should report it as soon as possible to the nearest DEC regional wildlife office or to: fwwildlf@gw.dec.state.ny.us and include “Eurasian boar” in the subject line.

Because it is sometimes difficult to distinguish a domestic pig, pot belly pig or Eurasian boar based solely on a description, reporting of all free-roaming swine is encouraged. Please report the number of animals seen, whether any of them were piglets, the date, and the exact location (county, town, distance and direction from an intersection, nearest landmark, etc.). Photographs of the animals are especially helpful, so please try to get a picture and include it with your report.

Full text of the regulation can be viewed on DEC’s website.

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