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Entries Tagged as 'snowshoe'

DEC Advises Backcountry Visitors of Winter Conditions Throughout Most of the Adirondacks

December 11th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Winter Recreational Opportunities Abound with Proper Preparation and Precautions

NYSDEC LogoThe recent snowstorm provided great conditions for winter outdoor recreation in the Adirondack backcountry the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reports today. Backcountry visitors should be prepared with proper clothing and equipment for snow, ice and cold to ensure a safe and enjoyable winter experience.


“Now that snows have arrived in the Adirondacks, winter recreationist can take advantage of all that the Park has to offer during the upcoming holiday vacation period,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens. “However, recreationist must be aware that winter can also present troublesome – even perilous – conditions to the unprepared. Visitors exploring the backcountry should dress for cold weather and use snowshoes and skis to navigate trails.”

Snow depths range from 6 to 20 inches or more. The deepest snows are in the eastern Adirondacks with the thinner depths in the western portion. Snow depths are deeper in the higher elevations like the High Peaks and other mountains over 3,000 feet.

Seasonal access roads are closed. Motor vehicles should not be driving on seasonal access roads that serve as snowmobile trails in the winter such as the Moose River Plains Road.

Most gates and designated snowmobile trails are or will be open by the weekend. Snowmobilers should check on local trail conditions before heading out. Skiers and snowshoers using designated snowmobile trails should keep to the side to allow safe passage of snowmobiles. Snowmobiles should slow down when passing skiers and snowshoers.

Visitors to the Eastern High Peaks are required to use snowshoes or cross-country skis for their safety and the safety of other backcountry users. It is strongly recommended that visitors to other parts of the Adirondacks do the same.

Skis or Snowshoes Required

Snowshoes or skis ease travel on snow and prevent “post holing”, which can ruin trails and cause sudden falls resulting in injuries. Ice crampons should be carried for use on icy mountaintops and other exposed areas. In addition, backcountry visitors should follow these safety guidelines:

  • Dress properly with layers of wool and fleece (NOT COTTON!) clothing: a wool or fleece hat, gloves or mittens, wind/rain resistant outer wear, and winter boots.
  • Carry a day pack with the following contents: Ice axe, plenty of food and water, extra clothing, map and compass, first-aid kit, flashlight/headlamp, sun glasses, sun-block protection, ensolite pads, stove and extra fuel, and bivy sack or space blankets.
  • Carry plenty of food and water. Eat, drink and rest often. Being tired, hungry or dehydrated makes you more susceptible to hypothermia.
    Check weather before entering the woods – if the weather is poor, postpone your trip.
  • Be aware of weather conditions at all times – if the weather worsens, head out of the woods.
  • Know the terrain and your physical capabilities – it takes more time and energy to travel through snow.
  • Never travel alone and always inform someone of your intended route and return time.
  • Traveling through snow takes more energy and time than hiking the same distance, especially in freshly fallen snow. Plan trips accordingly.

Ice has only recently formed on most waters especially on large waterbodies. Alternating periods of freezing and thawing have occurred over the past month weakening any ice that is present. Always check ice thickness before traveling across it. Avoid ice over running water, near inlets & outlet and near boathouses & docks – especially those with “bubblers” or other ice prevention devices. Ice that holds snow will not hold the weight of a snowmobile at this time and may not hold the weight of a person.

Skiers and snowshoers are reminded that the Avalanche Pass Slide in the Eastern High Peaks is closed to public recreation of any type during the winter.

Call the DEC Forest Ranger Emergency Dispatch at 518-891-0235 to report lost or injured people or other backcountry emergencies.

The DEC Adirondack Trail Information web page provides current trail condition information and links to current weather, snow cover and other important information to help ensure a safe and enjoyable Adirondack backcountry winter experience.

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DEC Advises Backcountry Visitors of Winter Conditions Throughout Most of the Adirondacks

December 17th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Winter Recreational Opportunities Abound with Proper Preparation and Precautions

NYSDEC LogoThe recent snowstorm provided great conditions for winter outdoor recreation in the Adirondack backcountry the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reports today. Backcountry visitors should be prepared with proper clothing and equipment for snow, ice and cold to ensure a safe and enjoyable winter experience.


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“Now that snows have arrived in the Adirondacks, winter recreationist can take advantage of all that the Park has to offer during the upcoming holiday vacation period,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens. “However, recreationist must be aware that winter can also present troublesome – even perilous – conditions to the unprepared. Visitors exploring the backcountry should dress for cold weather and use snowshoes and skis to navigate trails.”

Snow depths range from 8 – 20 inches or more. The deepest snows are in the western and southwestern Adirondacks and the thinner depths in the northeastern section. Snow depths are deeper in the higher elevations like the High Peaks and other mountains over 3000 feet.

Most designated snowmobile trails are open as well. Snowmobilers should check on local trail conditions before heading out. Skiers and snowshoers using designated snowmobiles trails should keep to the side to allow safe passage of snowmobiles. Snowmobiles should slow down when passing skiers and snowshoers.

The roadways on the Essex Chain Lakes Tract in the towns of Newcomb and Minerva in Essex County provide new excellent cross-country skiing and snowshoeing opportunities. The Town of Newcomb will plow the Goodnow Road and parking areas along the road near the access points to the Essex Chain Tract. This is the first time the public will be able to access these lands in the winter in more than 100 years.

Visitors to the Eastern High Peaks are required to use snowshoes or cross-country skis for their safety and the safety of other backcountry users. It is strongly recommended that visitors to other parts of the Adirondacks do the same.

Snowshoes or skis ease travel on snow and prevent “post holing”, which can cause sudden falls and result in injuries. Ice crampons should be carried for use on icy mountaintops and other exposed areas. In addition, backcountry visitors should follow these safety guidelines:

  • Dress properly with layers of wool and fleece (NOT COTTON!) clothing: a wool or fleece hat, gloves or mittens, wind/rain resistant outer wear, and winter boots.
  • Carry a day pack with the following contents: Ice axe, plenty of food and water, extra clothing, map and compass, first-aid kit, flashlight/headlamp, sun glasses, sun-block protection, ensolite pads, stove and extra fuel, and bivy sack or space blankets.
  • Carry plenty of food and water. Eat, drink and rest often. Being tired, hungry or dehydrated makes you more susceptible to hypothermia.
  • Check weather before entering the woods – if the weather is poor, postpone your trip.
  • Be aware of weather conditions at all times – if the weather worsens, head out of the woods.
  • Know the terrain and your physical capabilities – it takes more time and energy to travel through snow.
  • Never travel alone and always inform someone of your intended route and return time.

Traveling through snow takes more energy and time than hiking the same distance. Plan trips accordingly.

Ice has formed on most waters and is thickening on high elevation ponds and lakes and small to mid-size bodies of water. Check ice thickness before traveling across it. Avoid ice over running water, near inlets and outlet and near boathouses and docks – especially those with “bubblers” or other ice prevention devices. Ice that holds snow may not hold the weight of a person.

Skiers and snowshoers are reminded that the Avalanche Pass Slide in the Eastern High Peaks is closed to public recreation of any type during the winter.

Call the DEC Forest Ranger Emergency Dispatch at 518-891-0235 to report lost or injured people or other backcountry emergencies.

The DEC Adirondack Trail Information web page provides current trail condition information and links to current weather, snow cover and other important information to help ensure a safe and enjoyable Adirondack backcountry winter experience.

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Notice: High Water in the Adirondack High Peaks

March 13th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Danger Thin IceTuesday’s rain and warm temperature has raised the levels of waters in streams and drainages throughout the High Peaks. Crossings may be treacherous if not impossible.

Lakes and ponds, such as Avalanche Lake and Lake Colden, have a foot of water and slush on their surfaces and are not skiable.

Below freezing temperatures overnight have begun to harden snow but beware of thin crusts of snow or ice over top slush and water especially in low lying areas, over and around streams and drainages and on lakes and ponds.

Temperatures are expected to remain below freezing through the weekend. Water levels will drop and snow, ice and slush should harden.

Courtesy of: NYSDEC

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Cock-A-Doodle-Shoe Brings Competition and Fun to the Adirondack Coast

January 14th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

10K Snowshoe Race and Miles of Snow Covered Trails
Bring Winter Bliss

Cock-A-Doodle-ShoePlattsburgh, NY – On January 20, 2013 DION Snowshoes will heat up winter on the Adirondack Coast with Cock-A-Doodle-Shoe. Cock-A-Doodle Shoe, one of the Northeast’s regional qualifiers for the 2013 USSSA National Snowshoe Championships, is a 10K snowshoe race that makes use of the rolling trails covering most of New Land Trust’s 287 scenic acres in Saranac, NY. The competition is open to participants of all levels with $150 cash prize and a very unique trophy for the overall male and female winners. The entry fee for the race is $15 ($20 day-of) which gets you a t-shirt (only guaranteed to those who pre-register), merchandise raffle eligibility and post-race refreshments. Proceeds from the event will benefit The New Land Trust, a non-governmental, not for profit organization dedicated to developing and sustaining their property for health of the environment and the enjoyment of the public. Cock-A-Doodle-Shoe will begin promptly at 10:00am on Sunday January 20 with registration from 8:00am-9:45am for participants who did not pre-register at PreRace.com.

For more information on Cock-A-Doodle-Shoe visit cockadoodleshoe.com.

While on the Adirondack Coast take time to enjoy some of the best trails the east has to offer! Nordic skiers and snowshoers enjoy an extensive network of trails, both groomed and natural, in their choice of park or mountain settings. With miles and miles of trails the Adirondack Coast offers something for everyone from the expert to the beginner.

For more information on Nordic skiing and snowshoeing on the Adirondack Coast visit goadirondack.com

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DEC Warns of Snow, Ice and Cold in the Adirondack Backcountry

December 28th, 2012 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Snowshoe or Cross Country Skis Strongly Recommended for All Trails

NYSDEC LogoVisitors to the backcountry of the Adirondack Mountains should be prepared for snow, ice and cold, and use proper equipment, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation advised today. Winter is an opportune time to take advantage of all that the Adirondack Park has to offer, however, the season can also present troublesome — even perilous — conditions to the unprepared.

A foot or more of snow has accumulated throughout the Adirondacks. Visitors to the Eastern High Peaks are required to use snowshoes or cross-country skis for safety. It is strongly recommended that visitors to other parts of the Adirondacks do the same.

The use of snowshoes or skis prevents falls, avoids injuries and eases travel on snow. “Post-holing”, traveling through deep snow and leaving deep foot prints, takes much more energy and ruins trails for other users. Ice crampons should be carried for use on icy mountaintops and other exposed areas. In addition, backcountry visitors should follow these safety guidelines:

  • Dress properly with layers of non-cotton clothing: hat & gloves or mittens, wind/rain resistant outer wear and winter boots;
  • Carry a day pack complete with: plenty of food and water, extra clothing, a map and compass, a first-aid kit, a flashlight/headlamp, ensolite pads, a stove & extra fuel and a bivy sack or space blankets. On sunny days bring sunglasses and sun block. If hiking on icy, open mountain summits, carry an ice axe;
  • Drink plenty of water — dehydration can lead to hypothermia;
  • Eat plenty of food to maintain energy levels and warmth;
  • Check weather before entering the woods — if the weather is poor, postpone the trip. The mountains will always be there;
  • Be aware of weather conditions at all times — if weather worsens, leave the backcountry; and
  • Contact the DEC at (518) 897-1200 to obtain trail conditions in the area you plan to visit.
  • Traveling through snow takes more energy and time than hiking the same distance. Plan trips accordingly.

Waters have only recently begun freezing over and should not be considered safe to access. Ice that holds snow may not hold the weight of a person.

Avalanches can occur in any situation where snow, slope and weather conditions combine to create the proper conditions. Visitors planning to climb or ski in areas with steep, bare slopes should be aware of avalanche conditions. Before going out, put new batteries in transceivers and be sure they are working properly.

Check weather forecasts and pay attention to red flags such as more than a foot of snow in a 24 hour period, any amount of snow that falls at a rate of more than an inch per hour and high winds. Additional snow can stress existing snowpack. Winds can transport greater amounts of snow to leeward slopes and potentially create wind slabs.

Skiers and others planning to travel in avalanche prone terrain should learn to recognize the danger signs of an avalanche. Dig pits and make decisions based on your observations. Just because a slope has been skied, doesn’t mean that it can’t slide. Practice safe travel techniques, have a rescue plan and know how to self rescue. Bring your shovel, probe, have a pack with adequate equipment to handle whatever conditions you may encounter and have a good first-aid kit. Always inform someone where you plan to go and when you expect to return.

Skiers and snowshoers are reminded that the Avalanche Pass Slide is closed to public recreation of any type during the winter.

More information on avalanche danger and safety precautions is available on the DEC website.

Adirondack Trail Information can be found on the DEC website. The web pages provide general information and seasonal conditions, specific notices on closures and other situations involving trails, roads, foot bridges, etc. and links to rules & regulations, hiker and camper safety, low impact recreation, weather and more.

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Race to Benefit New Land Trust

December 13th, 2012 · No Comments · News

Cock-A-Doodle-Shoe Brings Competition to the Adirondack Coast
10K Snowshoe Race to Benefit the New Land Trust

Cock-A-Doodle-ShoePlattsburgh, NY– On January 20, 2013 DION Snowshoes will heat up winter on the Adirondack Coast with Cock-A-Doodle-Shoe. Cock-A-Doodle Shoe, one of the Northeast’s regional qualifiers for the 2013 USSSA National Snowshoe Championships, is a 10K snowshoe race that makes use of the rolling trails that cover most of New Land Trust’s 287 scenic acres in Saranac, NY. The competition is open to participants of all snowshoe levels with $150 cash prize and a very unique trophy for the overall male and female winners. The entry fee for the race is $15 ($20 day-of) which gets you a t-shirt (only guaranteed to those who pre-register), merchandise raffle eligibility and post-race refreshments. Proceeds from the event will benefit The New Land Trust, a non-governmental, not for profit organization dedicated to developing and sustaining their property for health of the environment and the enjoyment of the public. Cock-A-Doodle-Shoe will begin promptly at 10:00am on Sunday January 20 with registration from 8:00am-9:45am for participants who did not pre-register at PreRace.com.

For more information on Cock-A-Doodle-Shoe visit cockadoodleshoe.com.

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New Snow Means Winter Fun in the Adirondacks

February 24th, 2012 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Adirondack Mountain ClubLAKE PLACID, NY – The Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) urges winter sports enthusiasts to dust off their cross-country skis and snowshoes and head for the Adirondack High Peaks.

More than 6 inches of new snow fell Wednesday night at ADK’s Heart Lake property near Lake Placid, and more snow was falling on Friday, creating great conditions for winter fun.

“Winter is definitely here in the High Peaks,” said Ryan Doyle, ADK’s outdoor leadership coordinator. “If you’ve been waiting all winter to get outside and play in the snow, now is your chance.”

ADK offers a variety of winter recreation programs for all ages and skill levels, from beginner snowshoe and cross-country skiing workshops to winter hikes up trailless high peaks. All ADK outdoor workshops are conducted by our experienced, highly trained staff, who can help you develop the confidence and skills you’ll need for safe and rewarding winter adventures in the backcountry.

If you are looking for a chance to get outdoors with the kids or grandkids, join ADK for Family Snowshoe Day on Saturday, March 3. Spend the day snowshoeing on the beautiful trails at our Heart Lake property while learning about natural history and winter ecology. ADK will provide the snowshoes and instruction. Kids under 6 are free.

For more information about ADK’s winter outdoor workshops, visit our website at www.adk.org or call (518) 523-3411.

ADK also offers incomparable lodging at the historic Adirondak Loj, 8 miles south of Lake Placid and as close as you can get to the East’s greatest wilderness. Accommodations include private rooms, bunkrooms and a loft, and meal plans are available. For reservations, call (518) 523-3441.

For current information on weather and trail conditions, contact the High Peaks Information Center at (518) 523-3441 Ext. 21.

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