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Entries Tagged as 'tupper lake'

DEC Announces New Trail For Goodman Mountain in Franklin County

August 27th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Trail Dedicated to Honor the Memory of Andrew Goodman

NYSDEC LogoThe trail up Goodman Mountain in Franklin County, Town of Tupper Lake, is now complete, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens announced today. The Goodman Mountain trail is dedicated in honor and memory of civil rights activist Andrew Goodman. The new trailhead parking area and first quarter mile of the trail is wheelchair accessible and ideal for families with young children and people with limited mobility. The trail steepens before turning sharply and ascending to the 2,176-foot summit, where hikers will enjoy scenic views of the Adirondacks.

“This new trail is a great example of Governor Cuomo’s commitment to increasing access to outdoor recreation for New Yorkers and visitors to our state,” Commissioner Martens said. “The Governor has placed emphasis on creating facilities that welcome visitors of all abilities to explore state lands and providing an ever-increasing range of accessible opportunities. I am proud to help dedicate this trail to honor the memory of Andrew Goodman, frequently hiked to the summit of this mountain with his family as a young man from their nearby camp on Tupper Lake.”
Commissioner Martens and others on Goodman Mountain

Construction of the new trail was a joint effort amongst outdoor enthusiasts living in Tupper Lake, DEC staff and the Adirondack Park Agency. The trailhead parking area is on the east site of state route 30 just south of Tupper Lake. The trail begins with a .75-mile of gentle grade that follows the original highway leading south from Tupper Lake. The remaining mile is a pleasant stroll to the summit which provides views of Tupper Lake and the Adirondacks.

John L. Quinn, councilman and local volunteer said, “The Town of Tupper Lake is proud to co-host, along with the DEC and the Wild Center, a ceremony marking the dedication of a new trail to the summit of Goodman Mountain in Tupper Lake. The trail was established to honor the memory of slain civil rights activist Andrew Goodman who, with his family, has had a long-standing connection to our community that began in the 1930’s and continues to this day. The layout and construction of this trail was completed in a cooperative effort between DEC Region 6 staff and local volunteers. It is the Town’s hope that this new trail will be enjoyed by all and permanently serve as a tribute to Mr. Goodman’s sacrifice of 50 years ago.”

In June 1964, during “Freedom Summer” at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, 20-year old Andrew Goodman and fellow civil rights workers James Chaney and Michael Schwerner were murdered by the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi while working to register African-Americans to vote. Their murders served to galvanize public support for the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and resulted in the first successful federal prosecution of a civil rights case in Mississippi. The 1988 movie “Mississippi Burning” was loosely based upon this national tragedy. 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of both Andrew Goodman’s murder (June 21, 1964) and passage of the Civil Rights Act (July 2, 1964).

David Goodman, brother of Andrew said, “The Goodman Family is profoundly appreciative of the interest that Tupper Lake, and larger Adirondack Community, has shown over the years regarding the tragic fate of Andrew Goodman while he worked for peoples’ right to vote in Mississippi in 1964. Leaders in Tupper Lake have included the Bill Frenette Family, who successfully endeavored to name Goodman Mountain after my brother Andrew. In addition, others include John Quinn of Tupper Lake, The Wild Center, volunteer workers and so many others who have worked closely with DEC to install a beautiful trail to the summit of this state owned mountain. Under the direction of Commissioner Martens and his extraordinary staff, DEC has done a wonderful job throughout New York and the Adirondacks, bringing the natural beauty of the Empire State to all the people who want to experience it. Visitors to Tupper Lake will now have the opportunity to learn about Andrew Goodman and be reminded of this important event and its connection to local history.”

Litchfield Mountain was renamed Goodman Mountain by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2002 at the request of then Town of Tupper Lake Historian William Frenette. That renaming honored the memory of Charles Goodman and his grandson Andrew Goodman. The Goodman Family has strong ties to the community of Tupper Lake, having spent summers here since the 1930s at a camp built by Charles Goodman near Bog River Falls on Tupper Lake. Charles Goodman was responsible for the development of Lumberjack Spring in 1937, near the site of the trail head parking area.

Senator Hugh T. Farley said “I am pleased to extend my congratulations to all involved in developing this new hiking trail to the top of Goodman Mountain. This will provide additional recreational opportunities for visitors and local residents alike. This new trail, and dedication events, also provide a wonderful opportunity to remember and honor the Goodman family.”

“A new trail for families and visitors to enjoy is great news for beautiful Tupper Lake,” said Senator Betty Little. “How fitting to recognize and honor slain civil rights activist Andrew Goodman, a courageous trailblazer with a connection to this community whose sacrifice led to freedom and a better way of life for many others.”

Assemblyman Marc Butler said, “I am pleased to congratulate the DEC for their efforts in opening a new hiking trail in the Tupper Lake area for the public to use.”

Assemblywoman Janet L. Duprey said, “I regret a previous Assembly commitment prevents me from attending the Commemoration of the Goodman Mountain Trail at the Wild Center. I have had the opportunity to meet members of Andrew Goodman’s family In Tupper Lake and this tribute to Andy is most fitting. Andy was a strong advocate for the civil rights of all people, a tradition carried on by his family through the Goodman Foundation. Thanks to DEC for recognizing Andy Goodman with this honor.”

Mecca E. Santana, Esq. Chief Diversity Officer for NYS said, “Having spent the entirety of my professional life fighting for justice and equality, I ?am both honored and humbled to participate in this historic dedication ceremony celebrating the life and accomplishments of Andrew Goodman. The sacrifices of Andrew, and so many others who came before and after him, will never be forgotten.”

The parking lot, bridge, signs and trail were constructed with funding from the Environmental Protection Fund. Total costs were approximately $4350. Goodman Mountain is within the Horseshoe Lake Wild Forest and managed by the DEC Region 6 Lands and Forests staff in Watertown, NY. See more information on Adirondack trails .

Governor Cuomo has expanded recreational opportunities for residents and tourists, positioning New York State as a recreation destination, connecting communities to state lands, and improving the quality of life. This year’s State budget includes $6 million in NY Works funding to support the creation of 50 new land and water access projects to connect hunters, anglers, bird watchers and others who enjoy the outdoors to more than 380,000 acres of existing state and easement lands that have not reached their full potential. These 50 new access projects include building new boat launches, installing new hunting blinds and building new trails and parking areas.

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The New York State Police continue efforts in the search for Colin Gillis

September 20th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

The New York State Police, in conjunction with New York State DEC and Forest Rangers, are reminding the public of a missing person case, hoping they can assist in the search.

Missing Child - Colin Gillis

On March 11, 2012 around 2:00 AM, Colin Gillis, age 18, of Tupper Lake, New York, was last seen walking along State Route 3 between Tupper Lake and Piercefield. At the time, Gillis was wearing a white T-shirt with black stripes, blue jeans, red sneakers and a red and black down jacket. He is 6 foot tall, 170 lbs, and has blonde hair and blue eyes.

State Police are reminding those who are planning on participating in the upcoming hunting seasons, to be observant for anything unusual or out of the ordinary while they are in the woods. If the public observes anything they wish to report, or has any information in regards to Colin’s disappearance, contact the New York State Police at (518) 897-2000.

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Public Meetings Slated On Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor

August 28th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

State DEC and DOT to Host Four Sessions in September
NYSDEC LogoThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) today announced they will hold four public meetings in September about the management of the Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor, a 119-mile rail line in the western Adirondack Mountains.

Information and comments gathered from the public and stakeholder groups will help the commissioners of the two state agencies determine whether to amend the Remsen-Lake Placid Corridor Unit Management Plan. The plan, adopted by DEC and NYSDOT in March 1996, assesses the natural and physical resources along the 100-foot-wide corridor and identifies opportunities for public use. It guides how the corridor is used and managed.

The public meetings are scheduled for the following dates and locations:

  • Monday, September 9, 6-9 p.m. at the Town of Webb Park Avenue Office Building, 183 Park Avenue in Old Forge
  • Tuesday, September 10, 1-4 p.m. at the DEC Region 5 Headquarters, 1115 State Route 86, in Ray Brook
  • Monday, September 16, 1-4 p.m. at the State Office Building, 207 Genesee Street, In Utica
  • Tuesday, September 17, 6-9 the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, in Tupper Lake

The sessions will include a presentation by the state agencies and informational stations where the public can give state agency staff their comments and ideas verbally or in writing.

All of the meeting facilities are wheelchair accessible. Requests for directions or specific accommodations for any of the meetings may be directed to 518-897-1200 or 315-793-2327.

Written comments also may be submitted by Sept. 25 to, faxed to 518-457-3183, or mailed to Raymond F. Hessinger, Director, Freight & Passenger Rail Bureau, NYS Department of Transportation, 50 Wolf Road, POD 54, Albany, NY 12232.

The state acquired the Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor in 1975 from the bankrupt Penn Central Railroad. The rail line was constructed in 1892 and was operated by New York Central Railroad and, later, Penn Central Railroad until freight service ended in 1972.

NYSDOT manages the line in keeping with a Travel Corridor Unit Management Plan developed in conjunction with DEC. Approximately 100 miles of the corridor is located within the Adirondack Park. An additional 19 miles is located outside of the Park in the Tug Hill.

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Man Charged by DEC for Illegal Trapping Pleads Guilty

March 20th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoA Franklin County man pleaded guilty last week to 31 violations of Environmental Conservation Law related to illegal trapping, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation announced today.

On February 11, DEC Environmental Conservation Police charged Terry J. Hurteau, 56, of Tupper Lake, for offenses including unlawfully setting 15 snares for coyote, multiple counts for unlawful use of body gripping traps on land and multiple counts of failing to tag traps. He was issued appearance tickets for the Town of Tupper Lake Court.

DEC Environmental Conservation Officers (ECOs) initially responded to complaints about a coyote running through the yards of some Tupper Lake residence. The callers reported that the coyote appeared injured and tangled in what appeared to be wire.

ECOs located the coyote by tracking it through the snow. Due to the extent of its injuries and its entanglement in the snare, the animal was euthanized. However, the ECOs were able to use the snare to begin the investigation which led them to Hurteau.

Hurteau’s activities were extreme and flagrant violations of trapping law and regulation. They do not reflect the behavior of the vast majority of ethical trappers.

Hurteau appeared in court on March 6, and pleaded guilty to all charges. He was ordered to pay total of $3,875 in fines and surcharges.

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Maple sweetness at The Wild Center and Paul Smith’s College VIC

February 5th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Events scheduled for February and March

PAUL SMITHS, NY – The recent cold temperatures bode well for a good maple syrup season – and in February and March, The Wild Center and the Paul Smith’s College VIC will host several events showcasing how to make (and enjoy!) this quintessential springtime treat.

Over four weekends, watch how the sweet sap of trees becomes the highlight of a pancake breakfast and learn other ways to use this natural sweetener at a series of demonstrations, activities and events in both Tupper Lake and Paul Smiths.

Northern New York Maple Project

The Paul Smith’s College VIC will host two workshops for people interested in establishing their own backyard maple sugaring operations.

  • Toss out your old-fashioned maple taps – on Saturday, Feb. 16, from 1-4 p.m., learn how to set up a modern tubing system with Mike Farrell, director of the Cornell Maple Program. A brief classroom session will be followed by hands-on work at the VIC’s sugar maple demonstration site. Topics will include preparing the sugar bush prior to tubing installation; site considerations; line placement and installation; tapping trees; sanitation; and sap collection. Please dress for the weather and be prepared for a 2-3 mile snowshoe walk on groomed trails and uneven terrain. Bring your own snowshoes or borrow a pair from the VIC.
  • On Saturday, March 23, from 1-4 p.m., learn about the art of maple sugaring with special emphasis on backyard tapping, collection and boiling. At this event, part of New York State’s Maple Weekend, Paul Smith’s College students will lead workshops and provide tours of the sugarhouse and the maple demonstration site. Includes program and tastings for the whole family.

The Wild Center will also host a pair of workshops on Sunday, Feb. 24, and Saturday, March 16, to launch Tupper Lake’s first-ever community maple sugaring project. The project, one of the first in the state, invites area residents to tap maple trees in their own yards. The Wild Center will collect the sap daily once it starts to flow, ultimately boiling it down into maple syrup.

To participate, attend the free “Art of Maple Sugaring Breakfast and Workshop.” Registered participants will get a pancake breakfast, an introduction to the natural history of maple trees, expert instruction and tapping tools. Additional supplies will be available for purchase from The Wild Supply Company. Advanced registration is required; attendance at either workshop is necessary to participate in the project. Families are encouraged to attend.

After the workshops end, it’s all maple all day at The Wild Center, with maple stories, crafts and tastings on Feb. 24 and March 16. The Adirondack Museum will share local maple sugaring stories through historical objects and pictures from the past. Get insight into the sugaring process from experienced naturalists at 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. as they discuss tapping trees, processing sap, and – the sweet part – maple sugar. Take a closer look at an operational evaporator, catch some running sap and drill your own tap as we explore the local maple-sugaring story.

All events are free and open to the public. Registration is required. Visit Maple Weekends to register for events at The Wild Center or call (518) 359-7800. For events at the Paul Smith’s College VIC, contact Brian McDonnell at (518) 327-6241 or For more information, please visit us online at

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Presidents Week at The Wild Center

February 5th, 2013 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Wild Center LogoTupper Lake, NY – Don’t miss Presidents Week at The Wild Center, February 17th – February 24th as we celebrate the season with a week of wintery Adirondack fun. Everyday there is a new winter theme and activities for the whole family to enjoy. In addition to special daily winter programming there will be guided snowshoe walks, live animal encounters, and warm winter beverages. For more information, visit The WILD Center – Events.

Saturday, February 16th
Join us for opening day of Winter Week as we celebrate winter in the Adirondacks! Get outside and try your hand at snowshoeing with one of our naturalists. Or stay inside to learn about winter adventuring and to meet some of our Adirondack animals, whose adaptations allow them to cope with the harsh Adirondack winters in intriguing ways.

Sunday, February 17th
Noon theater program and 2:00 pm walk
Animal Tracking with Vince Walsh

Join Vince Walsh for a day on animal tracking and signs to learn how you can see, identify and interpret the natural world of the Adirondacks. Vince will share his experience and insight through multiple public programs starting with a 12:00 pm theater presentation on winter and its influences on animal behavior. Then bring your tracking questions, pictures and stories to Vince as he puzzles over your tracking experiences and discoveries. Don’t forget to bring some warm clothes so at 2:00 pm you can head outside to practice your tracking skills and use all your senses to see what evidence of animals you can find in the Adirondack forest. Snowshoes will be provided free with admission.

Monday, February 18th – 1:00 pm
Wild about Winter

Join naturalist and entertainer Rob Carr for a wild theater program about Adirondack animals in the winter. Filled with stories, humor, puppets and LOTS of live animals, it is guaranteed to please visitors of all ages.

Tuesday, February 19th – 1:00 pm
Winter Birds of the Adirondacks

Where have all the birdies gone? While it might seem like all our birds fly south when the weather gets chilly, there are plenty that stick around and tough out the Adirondack winters. Meet LIVE Adirondack birds in our theater at 1:00 pm for a fascinating program about birds and their winter adaptations. Follow up with a 2:00 pm bird walk along our trails, looking for signs of these tenacious feathered fliers and talking about the ways different species adapt for the cold.

Wednesday, February 20th – 1:00 pm
Creatures of the Night

Nighttime animals love the long winter nights. Join us in Planet Adirondack at 1:00 pm to meet live creatures of the night and get a glimpse into their nighttime habits.

Thursday, February 21st – 1:00 pm
Putting the Myth on Ice

Bears sleep all winter, plants stop growing and all birds fly south…or do they? Join naturalist Andrea Schwander for a fun-filled theater program of breaking down misconceptions and myth busting. The program will focus on some animal and winter myths, and will feature audience participation, demonstrations, and of course, some of The Wild Center’s live animals.

Friday, February 22nd – 1:00 pm

Not many choose to brave the cold Adirondack winters, not even in the animal kingdom. Lucky for us we have a couple of LIVE animals that tend to stick around instead of hightailing it to warmer areas. Come to our afternoon theater program to learn about their adaptations for obtaining food and energy in the long cold days of winter.

Saturday, February 23rd – 1:00 pm
The Travel Troupe

Join The Wild Center in welcoming the Ronathahonni Cultural Center’s Travel Troupe. Come learn about their cultural history through song, dance and storytelling at 1:00 pm in our Flammer Theater.

Sunday, February 24th – 9:00 am
Pancake Breakfast and Sugaring Workshop

The Wild Center is joining Tupper Lake community members and their sugar maple trees to create a community-driven Maple Sugar house. For local residents: register for the 9:00 am free Pancake Breakfast and Sugaring Workshop to learn more about our community maple project. Register at and see how you can get involved.

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Syracuse University Students Present Re-use Proposals For Oval Wood Dish Factory

November 27th, 2012 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Tupper Lake, NY – Since the Oval Wood Dish factory in Tupper Lake closed in 2008, residents of this tight-knit community have often wondered what would become of the 103,000 square foot factory that once employed three generations of village residents. On Wednesday, December 12th at 6pm at The Wild Center, five student teams from Syracuse University will present their ideas. Refreshments will be served.

Syracuse University conducts an annual Industrial Design competition that presents students with a design challenge. In 2012, Syracuse faculty chose to study the former Oval Wood Dish factory site in Tupper Lake for their challenge.

The competition titled “Product, Factory, Community: Creative re-use of the Oval Wood Dish Factory” promotes consideration of regional resources, community development, factory re-use, and sustainable product development.

The industrial and interaction design (IID) program in the College of Visual and Performing Arts’ (VPA) Department of Design runs the 360 Competition. Professor Donald Carr, who led the students through the process, noted, “The goal for the IID 360 competition is to explore ideas for the creative re-use of an idle factory. By leveraging the ‘renewable resources’ of the region, the goal is to create a design proposal that speaks to the needs of a community. Tupper Lake has met the challenges faced by all rural communities in the region with energy and optimism; the community will be an active partner in facilitating redevelopment of the site.” Carr hoped the students would develop ideas for creative products that could be made at OWD or uses for the building that incorporate sustainable wood products.

Both the property owner, Mr. Norman Bobrow, and the community of Tupper Lake have been supportive of the student’s efforts. Members of the Revitalization Committee toured the students on a site visit in September. Syracuse University student ideas will inform a feasibility study of various redevelopment options that will be conducted by the Revitalization Committee this winter, using a Brownfield Opportunity Area grant from the Department of State. Tupper Lake Mayor Paul Maroun stated, “I have met with these students, and I was impressed with the depth of their questions and knowledge of the area. I look forward to their recommendations.”

Syracuse University professor, Philip Stevens, set up an endowment that funds the annual 360 Competition. The winner of the competition will receive the Philip H. Stevens Award, which is named in honor of Stevens ’51, an industrial designer and president of Philip Stevens Associates Ltd. in Skaneateles, who made a generous gift of $100,000 to the program with his wife, Margueritte.

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