Adirondack Base Camp header image

Entries Tagged as 'News'

DEC Announces Early Bear Hunting Seasons to Begin

September 5th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Bear Hunting Seasons Begin September 6 in Portions of Southeastern New York and September 13 in Northern New York

NYSDEC LogoUnder Governor Cuomo’s NY Open for Fishing and Hunting Initiative, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens today announced that the new 2014 early bear hunting seasons open at sunrise on Saturday, September 6, in portions of New York’s southern zone and Saturday, September 13, in the northern zone.

“Early black bear hunting seasons are an important tool for managers to control bear populations, and beginning Saturday, hunters will have a new opportunity to pursue bears in portions of the Catskills and western Hudson Valley,” said Commissioner Martens. “Opening these early seasons demonstrates Governor Cuomo’s commitment to increasing hunting opportunities here in New York State for sportsmen and women.”

Following recommendations in DEC’s recently adopted bear management plan to reduce bear populations in the region, the new early firearms bear season runs from September 6-21 in Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) 3A, 3C, 3H, 3J, 3K, 3M, 3P, 3R, 4P, and 4R. The early bowhunting season for bears will then open in all of the Southern Zone on October 1, followed by the regular firearms season beginning November 15.

Bear in GrassNew this year, DEC has also expanded bear hunting in northern New York to include WMUs 6A, 6G, 6K and 6N. In these newly opened units, bear hunting begins with bowhunting equipment only from September 13 through October 17. In the rest of northern New York (WMUs 5A, 5C, 5F, 5G, 5H, 5J, 6C, 6F, 6H, and 6J), the early firearms season begins Saturday, September 13 and continues until October 17. Muzzleloader season then opens in all northern WMUs on October 18, followed by the regular firearms season for bear on October 25.

During these early seasons, or whenever hunting in warm conditions, bear hunters should be prepared to skin and cool harvested bears as soon as possible to protect the quality of the meat. Hunters may consider skinning and quartering the bear in the field and packing out the meat in game bags.

As part of the NY Open for Fishing and Hunting Initiative, New York streamlined the hunting and fishing license structure, made it consistent for resident and non-residents, and reduced license fees. Some hunters and anglers may not be familiar with these license changes, but licensing-issuing agents are prepared to provide assistance and ensure the license buyers secure all the desired permits and privileges. Highlights of the sporting licenses changes are available on DEC’s website.

In addition, the new Hunting & Trapping regulation guides are available at all license issuing outlets, as well as on DEC’s website.

In support of the NY Open for Fishing and Hunting Initiative, this year’s budget includes $6 million in NY Works funding to support creating 50 new land and water access projects to connect hunters, anglers, bird watchers and others who enjoy the outdoors to more than 380,000 acres of existing state and easement lands that have not reached their full potential. These 50 new access projects include building new boat launches, installing new hunting blinds and building new trails and parking areas. In addition, the 2014-15 budget includes $4 million to repair the state’s fish hatcheries; and renews and allows expanded use of crossbows for hunting in New York State.

DEC regulates black bear hunting to manage populations toward levels that are acceptable to the public. Information about black bear hunting in New York, including season dates and regulations, is available on DEC’s website. Additionally, DEC’s booklet Hunting the Black Bear in New York (PDF) (937 KB), includes tips on bear hunting and proper care of harvested bears.

Tags: ·····

DEC Announces New Trail For Goodman Mountain in Franklin County

August 27th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Trail Dedicated to Honor the Memory of Andrew Goodman

NYSDEC LogoThe trail up Goodman Mountain in Franklin County, Town of Tupper Lake, is now complete, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens announced today. The Goodman Mountain trail is dedicated in honor and memory of civil rights activist Andrew Goodman. The new trailhead parking area and first quarter mile of the trail is wheelchair accessible and ideal for families with young children and people with limited mobility. The trail steepens before turning sharply and ascending to the 2,176-foot summit, where hikers will enjoy scenic views of the Adirondacks.

“This new trail is a great example of Governor Cuomo’s commitment to increasing access to outdoor recreation for New Yorkers and visitors to our state,” Commissioner Martens said. “The Governor has placed emphasis on creating facilities that welcome visitors of all abilities to explore state lands and providing an ever-increasing range of accessible opportunities. I am proud to help dedicate this trail to honor the memory of Andrew Goodman, frequently hiked to the summit of this mountain with his family as a young man from their nearby camp on Tupper Lake.”
Commissioner Martens and others on Goodman Mountain

Construction of the new trail was a joint effort amongst outdoor enthusiasts living in Tupper Lake, DEC staff and the Adirondack Park Agency. The trailhead parking area is on the east site of state route 30 just south of Tupper Lake. The trail begins with a .75-mile of gentle grade that follows the original highway leading south from Tupper Lake. The remaining mile is a pleasant stroll to the summit which provides views of Tupper Lake and the Adirondacks.

John L. Quinn, councilman and local volunteer said, “The Town of Tupper Lake is proud to co-host, along with the DEC and the Wild Center, a ceremony marking the dedication of a new trail to the summit of Goodman Mountain in Tupper Lake. The trail was established to honor the memory of slain civil rights activist Andrew Goodman who, with his family, has had a long-standing connection to our community that began in the 1930’s and continues to this day. The layout and construction of this trail was completed in a cooperative effort between DEC Region 6 staff and local volunteers. It is the Town’s hope that this new trail will be enjoyed by all and permanently serve as a tribute to Mr. Goodman’s sacrifice of 50 years ago.”

In June 1964, during “Freedom Summer” at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, 20-year old Andrew Goodman and fellow civil rights workers James Chaney and Michael Schwerner were murdered by the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi while working to register African-Americans to vote. Their murders served to galvanize public support for the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and resulted in the first successful federal prosecution of a civil rights case in Mississippi. The 1988 movie “Mississippi Burning” was loosely based upon this national tragedy. 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of both Andrew Goodman’s murder (June 21, 1964) and passage of the Civil Rights Act (July 2, 1964).

David Goodman, brother of Andrew said, “The Goodman Family is profoundly appreciative of the interest that Tupper Lake, and larger Adirondack Community, has shown over the years regarding the tragic fate of Andrew Goodman while he worked for peoples’ right to vote in Mississippi in 1964. Leaders in Tupper Lake have included the Bill Frenette Family, who successfully endeavored to name Goodman Mountain after my brother Andrew. In addition, others include John Quinn of Tupper Lake, The Wild Center, volunteer workers and so many others who have worked closely with DEC to install a beautiful trail to the summit of this state owned mountain. Under the direction of Commissioner Martens and his extraordinary staff, DEC has done a wonderful job throughout New York and the Adirondacks, bringing the natural beauty of the Empire State to all the people who want to experience it. Visitors to Tupper Lake will now have the opportunity to learn about Andrew Goodman and be reminded of this important event and its connection to local history.”

Litchfield Mountain was renamed Goodman Mountain by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2002 at the request of then Town of Tupper Lake Historian William Frenette. That renaming honored the memory of Charles Goodman and his grandson Andrew Goodman. The Goodman Family has strong ties to the community of Tupper Lake, having spent summers here since the 1930s at a camp built by Charles Goodman near Bog River Falls on Tupper Lake. Charles Goodman was responsible for the development of Lumberjack Spring in 1937, near the site of the trail head parking area.

Senator Hugh T. Farley said “I am pleased to extend my congratulations to all involved in developing this new hiking trail to the top of Goodman Mountain. This will provide additional recreational opportunities for visitors and local residents alike. This new trail, and dedication events, also provide a wonderful opportunity to remember and honor the Goodman family.”

“A new trail for families and visitors to enjoy is great news for beautiful Tupper Lake,” said Senator Betty Little. “How fitting to recognize and honor slain civil rights activist Andrew Goodman, a courageous trailblazer with a connection to this community whose sacrifice led to freedom and a better way of life for many others.”

Assemblyman Marc Butler said, “I am pleased to congratulate the DEC for their efforts in opening a new hiking trail in the Tupper Lake area for the public to use.”

Assemblywoman Janet L. Duprey said, “I regret a previous Assembly commitment prevents me from attending the Commemoration of the Goodman Mountain Trail at the Wild Center. I have had the opportunity to meet members of Andrew Goodman’s family In Tupper Lake and this tribute to Andy is most fitting. Andy was a strong advocate for the civil rights of all people, a tradition carried on by his family through the Goodman Foundation. Thanks to DEC for recognizing Andy Goodman with this honor.”

Mecca E. Santana, Esq. Chief Diversity Officer for NYS said, “Having spent the entirety of my professional life fighting for justice and equality, I ?am both honored and humbled to participate in this historic dedication ceremony celebrating the life and accomplishments of Andrew Goodman. The sacrifices of Andrew, and so many others who came before and after him, will never be forgotten.”

The parking lot, bridge, signs and trail were constructed with funding from the Environmental Protection Fund. Total costs were approximately $4350. Goodman Mountain is within the Horseshoe Lake Wild Forest and managed by the DEC Region 6 Lands and Forests staff in Watertown, NY. See more information on Adirondack trails .

Governor Cuomo has expanded recreational opportunities for residents and tourists, positioning New York State as a recreation destination, connecting communities to state lands, and improving the quality of life. This year’s State budget includes $6 million in NY Works funding to support the creation of 50 new land and water access projects to connect hunters, anglers, bird watchers and others who enjoy the outdoors to more than 380,000 acres of existing state and easement lands that have not reached their full potential. These 50 new access projects include building new boat launches, installing new hunting blinds and building new trails and parking areas.

Tags: ···

DEC Reminds People to Adhere to Safety Regulations at Ring of Fire Celebration on Great Sacandaga Lake

August 27th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoAs people gather to celebrate the end-of-summer tradition known as the Ring of Fire on Sacandaga Lake, the State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reminds them that there are specific environmental regulations for open fires. To ensure this annual celebration is enjoyable and protective of the environment, DEC environmental conservation officers (ECOs) will be patrolling the area to monitor that fires are safe and adhere to all applicable state regulations.

“DEC supports the Ring of Fire and wants to ensure that this year’s celebration is safe for all involved,” DEC Regional Director Robert Stegemann said. “Our goal is to make sure people are aware of specific regulations for bonfires and use appropriate fuel. By following these simple rules, the Ring of Fire will be an enjoyable time for boaters on the water or individuals and families along the shores of the Sacandaga.”

The use of traditional bonfires on the lake can be done lawfully, but in recent years there have been incidents where environmental laws were violated, specifically related to the types of fuel used for these fires. Permissible fuel types are limited to untreated (clean) wood, wood generated on-site or firewood. Prohibited materials include chemically treated wood or lumber, plastics and synthetic materials.

The DEC patrols will check for violations and will also advise people of potential issues with individual bonfires. Penalties for violations may result in a minimum $500 fine.

Tags:

DEC Announces $475,000 in Upgrades Planned for Upper Saranac Lake Boat Launch

August 14th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Launch Will Close September 8 to Facilitate Repairs and Reopen May 2015

NYSDEC LogoTo support improved access to Upper Saranac Lake, $475,000 in upgrades will be made to the Upper Saranac Lake Boat Launch, state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens announced today. The upgrades, funded by NY Works, will be completed prior to the 2015 Memorial Day Weekend.

“Governor Cuomo has demonstrated a strong commitment to increasing access to the state’s beautiful natural resources,” Commissioner Martens said. “Upgrades to the Upper Saranac boat launch will allow outdoor enthusiasts easier access to recreate on this magnificent lake and will better protect the lake’s water quality.”

The boat launch, located at the intersection of County 46 and Back Bay Road, is one of two public boat launches that provide access to Upper Saranac Lake. The planned improvements include:

  • constructing a new (2 lane) boat ramp;
  • removing dock cribbing;
  • installing new floating docks;
  • regrading slopes to decrease steepness and decrease erosion;
  • paving the entrance, ramp entrance and parking area;
  • permanent stormwater pollution prevention measures;
  • reconfiguring traffic patterns;
  • upgrading bathroom facility;
  • landscaping and planting;
  • adding a dry hydrant for fire protection; and
  • adding a boat rinse station to flush out bilges, live wells and areas containing water.

Governor Cuomo included $6 million in NY Works funding in this year’s budget to support creating 50 new land and water access projects to connect hunters, anglers, bird watchers and others who enjoy the outdoors to more than 380,000 acres of existing state and easement lands that have not reached their full potential. These 50 new access projects include building new boat launches, installing new hunting blinds and building new trails and parking areas. In addition, the 2014-15 budget includes $4 million to repair the state’s fish hatcheries; and renews and allows expanded use of crossbows for hunting in New York State.

Camp owners and others that use the Upper Saranac Lake Boat Launch to take their boat off the lake for the winter will need to use private marinas to launch or retrieve boats during the reconstruction period, September 8, 2014 through May 15, 2015.

Small boats can use the boat launch at DEC’s Fish Creek Pond Campground. Shallow water at the boat launch and less than eight feet height between the water and the bottom of a campground road near the boat launch allows only small boats to use the Fish Creek Campground Boat Launch. There is no fee to launch or retrieve a boat, but there is an $8.00 parking fee for vehicles.

The renovated boat launch will be open for public use prior to Memorial Day Weekend 2015.

Tags: ···

DEC Guidance for Discouraging Nuisance Black Bear

July 24th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoThe summer outdoor recreation season is well underway and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is advising homeowners and tourists about ways to discourage bears from becoming a nuisance. Black bears will take advantage of almost any readily available food source. Once bears learn about human food sources, it is not easy to recondition them to the wild and this can lead to conflicts between bears and people. It is against the law to feed bear, deer and moose.

During midsummer and dry conditions, the black bear’s natural foods are much more difficult to find. DEC Wildlife and Law Enforcement staff respond with technical advice as quickly as possible but local residents and visitors are responsible for preventing bears from gaining access to food items such as bird food, garbage and unattended coolers.

Bear in GrassBlack bears are generally timid and avoid people but if allowed access to human foods, chronic problems can develop. It is against DEC regulations to directly or indirectly feed bears and people who feed bears, intentionally or otherwise, are doing bears a great disservice. Once a bear learns to get food from people, it can be difficult to change the animal’s behavior. Bears are vulnerable to motor vehicle collisions in populated areas. In addition, if behaviors reach certain thresholds, in order to protect public safety, DEC biologists may determine it necessary to euthanize an offending bear. It is always a last resort to take a bear.

Once a bear becomes a problem, people often request that the bear be moved. Bear relocations can work if the bear isn’t solely feeding from human sources. Relocating bears is extremely time consuming and does not solve the overriding problem if people are feeding them. Bears are extremely mobile and have an excellent sense of smell and homing abilities and may return to the original capture site or start a new problem where there was none. If food attractants are not managed correctly new bears will be quickly attracted and the problem will persist. The key to preventing or solving most problems between bears and people is to eliminate the artificial food sources provided by people.

New Yorkers can help by following these guidelines:

  • When camping, keep food out of sight and secured in a vehicle if one is available. Hang food and garbage from a tree, out of reach (8 feet or higher). Also, keep picnic tables, utensils, fireplaces and the area around them clean. Do not leave coolers unattended.
  • Do not feed birds through the summer. Birds don’t really need supplemental food this time of year when their natural food is most abundant.
  • Dispose of garbage as frequently as possible. Store it in clean, secure containers (top-latched, tied or chained). Double bag meat scraps in a zip lock bag. Use ammonia soaked rags inside the garbage bag before closing. Tie off garbage bag before placing in container.
  • Do not leave dirty diapers or diaper pails outside.
  • If you live in an area frequented by bears, periodically disinfect or scrub garbage cans with Lysol, ammonia or bleach & water, store your garbage cans in a secure place such as a garage, cellar or a bear-resistant container, instead of a porch if possible.
  • If your garbage is picked up at the curb, put the garbage out just before the scheduled pickup or place it in a roadside bear-resistant container. Don’t put garbage out the night before pick-up at the curb.
  • Feed pets and store foods indoors. If you must feed outdoors, give only enough food for one feeding, take in all uneaten food and dishes before dark.
  • Remember that the smell of cooked foods may attract wandering bears closer to your house. Clean up after your picnic or barbecue. Keep barbeque grills as clean as possible and after they cool down store them inside. Do not overlook cleaning the grease trap.
  • Don’t add meat scraps, bones or melon rinds to your compost pile.
  • Don’t leave food visible for bears to see in through windows. Close blinds if necessary.
  • It’s against the law to feed a bear. If you witness bear feeding activity, report the incident to DEC Law Enforcement immediately.

Residents and tourists alike are asked to respect bears as wild animals so everyone can enjoy them with a minimum of problems.
More information: Reducing Human-Bear Conflicts

Tags: ·····

DEC And DOT Announce Plans To Reinvigorate The Remsen To Lake Placid Travel Corridor

July 10th, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

State Agencies Seek Public Input on Possible Unit Management Plan Amendment to Convert the Tupper Lake to Lake Placid Segment to a Recreational Trail

State Agencies Will Also Explore Options to Bolster Rail Service Along Remainder of the Corridor and to Create and Expand Snowmobile Routes to Connect Communities between Old Forge and Tupper Lake

The State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Transportation (DOT) today announced that they will reopen the 1996 Unit Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement (1996 UMP/EIS) for the Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor. The review will evaluate use of the Tupper Lake to Lake Placid segment for a recreational trail. It will also examine opportunities to maintain and realize the full economic potential of rail service on the remainder of the corridor. In addition, the state will review options to create and expand alternative snowmobile corridors to connect communities from Old Forge to Tupper Lake on existing state lands and conservation easements.

The UMP governs the use of the 119-mile Remsen to Lake Placid Travel Corridor. The determination to revisit the UMP was made following a thorough assessment of options and a review of the extensive public comments made during four public meetings held by DEC and DOT last year.

DEC and DOT will prepare the UMP and draft EIS, which will explore opportunities to increase recreational use of the rail corridor and ensure it promotes tourism and economic growth in the surrounding communities. As part of this process, the public will have an opportunity to review and comment on a draft scope that outlines significant issues and environmental impacts, and guides preparation of the UMP and draft EIS. In addition, the public will be able to review and comment on the draft UMP and draft EIS when they are deemed complete.

Revisiting the 1996 UMP/EIS will enable DEC and DOT to thoroughly review those aspects of the 1996 UMP/EIS that recommend enhanced recreational opportunities and community connections, and to examine alternatives for the best future use of the Corridor along the Tupper Lake to Lake Placid segment. DEC and DOT will work with the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) and public stakeholders, including local officials and residents, to assess alternatives that reflect current realities along the corridor and potential environmental and economic impacts.

“Our goal is to protect our natural resources, while also exploring ways to increase opportunities for people to enjoy outdoor recreation activities in the Adirondacks,” DEC Commissioner Martens said. “We recognize that the future of the Remsen to Lake Placid Travel Corridor is important to local residents, communities and the regional economy, and the UMP process is the appropriate way to determine the best use of the corridor. We greatly appreciate the input received and continue to encourage the public and stakeholders to be actively involved in the UMP process since their views and interests will be an important part of the decision-making process.”

“The Remsen-Lake Placid Travel Corridor is a tremendous transportation resource that traverses stunning landscapes across the northern Adirondacks,” DOT Commissioner Joan McDonald said. “In response to public interest, we are reopening the Unit Management Plan, providing new opportunities to engage local communities and support the regional economy as we plan for the corridor’s future.”

The UMP process will provide a transparent and public means of exploring a proposed amendment to the 1996 UMP/EIS that would maximize benefits from public use of the corridor and conform with the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan. Any proposed amendment would consider and incorporate public comments.

The rail service envisioned by the 1996 UMP/EIS has never been fully realized. The recurring short term lease under which the Adirondack Scenic Railroad operates has hindered the capital investment necessary to improve the rail line in the most remote sections of the corridor. This review will evaluate options to provide the long-term assurance to the rail operator and its investors need to move forward with much needed improvements.

Snowmobilers have long used the travel corridor during peak season to transit between communities. That use is made unsafe during periods of lesser snow as track becomes exposed. As part of this review, DEC will evaluate ways to expand snowmobile routes between the communities along the Old Forge to Tupper Lake segment of the corridor on state lands and conservation easements. This will open new recreational and tourism opportunities for those communities but also provide a safer riding experience for the snowmobiling community.

Tags: ·····

Adirondacks: Fourth of July Holiday Weekend Notice

July 3rd, 2014 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoThe Adirondacks are open for summer recreation, come and enjoy all that our lands and waters have to offer! Please be advised of the following conditions and prepare for them to ensure a safe and enjoyable outdoor recreational experience. This information focuses on the High Peaks Region, for more information or for information on other areas in the Adirondacks visit the DEC trail information web pages at: Adirondack Trail Information

ADIRONDACK BACKCOUNTRY VISITORS

If you are recreating in the Adirondacks this Fourth of July Holiday weekend, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation asks that you be aware of the following:

HIGH USAGE LEVELS: Visitors to the Adirondacks should expect to encounter more people on the water and trails this holiday weekend. Popular campgrounds, trailhead parking lots, boat launch sites and interior campsites will likely fill to capacity. The Eastern High Peaks may reach capacity by Thursday. Plan accordingly and seek recreational opportunities in other less used areas of the Adirondack Forest Preserve.

ESSEX CHAIN LAKES: 22 designated tent sites are currently available the area around the Essex Chain Lakes. Thirteen designated along the shores of the waters of the complex require a free permit. Campers must call 518-582-2000 or visit the Adirondack Interpretive Center facility at 5922 State Route 28N in Newcomb, NY, to reserve a tent site. Campers can pick up their reserved permit at the AIC facility between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. any day of the week. See the Essex Chain Lakes Complex web page for more information on camping and other outdoor recreational opportunities in this area.

POOR MAN’S DOWNHILL SHUTTLE BUS: The Town of Wilmington will operate a shuttle bus for mountain bikers on Sunday July 6, between 1 pm and 4 pm. The shuttle will take mountain bikers from the downhill trailhead off Route 86 to the uphill trailhead off Route 431. The Poor Man’s Downhill is a multi-use trail on the northeast side of Whiteface Mountain. The trail begins just below the toll booth for the Whiteface Mountain Veteran’s Memorial Highway and ends 1,150 feet lower and nearly 3 miles away in the hamlet of Wilmington.

MUDDY & WET TRAILS: Mud and water will be present on all trails. Trails along water may be flooded. Wear waterproof footwear and gaiters and walk through – not around – mud and water to prevent eroding and widening the trail.

BEAR RESISTANT CANISTERS: Regulation requires the use of bear-resistant canisters by overnight users in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness between April 1 and November 30. NYSDEC encourages the use of bear resistant canisters throughout the Adirondacks.

OTHER BEAR AVOIDANCE TIPS

  • Store all food, toiletries and garbage in bear-resistant canisters.
  • Outside the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness, if you don’t have a bear canister, hang food. Store all food, toiletries and garbage in the hang bag. Use a 75 ft. (25 m) long dark- colored cord. Hang the bag 15 ft (5 m) above the ground and at least 10 ft (3 m) away from trees.
  • Keep food in bear-resistant canister or food hangs at all times – take down only what is needed for cooking and eating.
  • Never leave food unattended unless it is in a bear-resistant canister or in a food hang.
  • Cook early, no later than 5 p.m., and never cook or eat in your sleeping area.

BITING INSECTS: Black Flies, Mosquitoes, Deer Flies and/or Midges (No-see-ums) are everywhere. Follow these steps to minimize the nuisance of biting insects:

  • Wear light colored clothing, long sleeve shirts and long pants;
  • Tuck shirts into pants, the bottom of pant legs into socks and button sleeves at the wrist;
  • Wear a headnet when insects are thick and use an insect repellant with DEET.

Visit the Adirondack Trail Information web page for current weather forecasts, regulations, safety tips, trail conditions, and more.

Enjoy your visit to the Adirondacks!
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

Tags: ······