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Adirondack Experience Sues to Vacate Village of Lake Placid Effort to Seize Property via Eminent Domain

July 14th, 2017 · No Comments · Adirondack News

BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE, N.Y. – July 14, 2017 – On Thursday, July 13, Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake, filed a lawsuit to counter efforts on the part of the Village of Lake Placid to seize its property via eminent domain.

The Church of the Nazarene formerly occupied the Adirondack Experience’s property in Lake Placid

The Church of the Nazarene formerly occupied the Adirondack Experience’s property in Lake Placid

The Village asserts that the two parcels, at 2476 and 2478 Main Street, are need to assemble a site for a proposed parking garage. At a public hearing on the issue held on March 13, 2017 in Lake Placid, members of the public were virtually unanimous in their rejection of the Village board’s proposal to build a garage on the site – and the proposal to use eminent domain to seize the property of a nonprofit institution. Press accounts and social media postings have similarly been harshly critical of the plan. Despite this, the Village Board on June 12 held a special meeting during which it issued a determination and findings that there is a public need for the museum’s property. The board meeting was held following the expiration of the 90-day time within which, by law, the Board was required to issue its determination and findings. The Village also failed to hold a public hearing on the environmental impact of the proposed garage project.

Adirondack Experience is petitioning the Supreme Court’s Appellate Division, Third Department, to vacate the Village board’s action. The petition is based on both procedural flaws in the legal steps the Village has pursued and on the fact that the Village has failed to demonstrate that there is a need for the public taking of the museum’s property.

Mayor Randall at the June 12 special board meeting that was held to seize the museum’s property.

Mayor Randall at the June 12 special board meeting that was held to seize the museum’s property.

Within days, Adirondack Experience will also file a separate suit against the Town of North Elba to reverse suspicious punitive actions taken by Town Assessor on March 14 in an apparent effort to pressure the museum and support the eminent domain effort. On March 14, the day following the Village’s March 13 eminent domain hearing, the Assessor revoked the museum property’s tax exempt status and slashed the property’s assessed value from $1,188,000 (it had been $1,888,400 in 2010) to a rock bottom $850,000. The $850,000, not coincidentally, reflects the amount the Village would like to pay for the property, which was appraised at $1,500,000 in 2015. The second lawsuit will be filed in Supreme Court against the Town of North Elba and seek to have the Assessor’s punitive action reversed and the tax exemption restored.

David M. Kahn, Adirondack Experience’s Executive Director, said, “The Village of Lake Placid board’s attempt to grab the Adirondack Experience property for pennies on the dollar is unconscionable. They have damaged the value of the museum’s assets by attempting to manipulate its apparent value though the slight-of-hand reduction of its assessed value. We are confident that the courts will give the museum a fair hearing and put an end to this unprecedented assault on a nonprofit organization.”

About Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake

Visitors at the Adirondack Experience in Blue Mountain Lake

Visitors at the Adirondack Experience in Blue Mountain Lake

The Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake, accredited by the American Association of Museums, shares the history and culture of the Adirondack region in 24 historic and contemporary buildings on a 121-acre campus in the Central Adirondacks, and in free programs at schools throughout Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, Oneida, Saratoga, St. Lawrence, Warren and Washington Counties. The museum is supported in part with donations from the general public, with some general operating support made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo York State Council on the Arts
with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. For additional information, call 518-352-7311 or visit www.theADKX.org.

Petition to Annul Condemnor’s Determination (PDF)

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DEC to Reopen Lower Locks on Saranac Chain of Lakes on Saturday, July 1

June 30th, 2017 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Boaters Again Able to Access Five Lakes and 5,000+ Acres of Water Starting this Weekend

Repairs and rehabilitation work on the Lower Locks that provide passage on the Saranac River allowing boaters to access the waters between Lake Flower and Lower Saranac Lake have been completed and the locks will be open for use on July 1, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Regional Director Robert Stegemann announced today.

“The Lower Locks have long been a unique and essential structure for recreating on more than 5,000 acres of water, including five large lakes, in the Saranac Lake area,” said Director Stegemann. “These improvements improve lock operations and greatly reduce the number of times, and possibly eliminate, lock closure for minor repairs.”

Improvements included:

  • Rehabilitating the fill and release doors and the wicket (main) doors, including replacing all seals and bearings;
  • Completely replacing the hydraulic system including hydraulic arms, lines and operating system;
  • Repairing concrete walls;
  • Replacing and re-equipping the Locks Operator Shed; and
  • Replacing all tie downs, ropes, and other equipment.

DEC staff will be present to operate the locks from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily. Site cleanup of materials and equipment associated with the repair and rehabilitation work has not been completed, boaters should remain in their boats while at locks.

Repairs were also completed this spring on a broken swing arm on the Upper Locks, providing additional access for boaters between Lower Saranac and Middle Saranac lakes.

The $1.2 million project was funded through NY Works under a New York State Office of General Services contract. CHA Companies of Albany, NY, provided the design and inspection. Friend Construction and Dow Electrical, both of Malone, NY, completed the work under DEC supervision.

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BoatUS Says More Boaters on the Water for July Fourth Holiday

June 28th, 2017 · No Comments · Adirondack News

8 safety tips for boating’s busiest time of the year

ANNAPOLIS, Md., June 27, 2017 — The nation’s largest advocacy, services and safety group for recreational boaters, Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS), says July Fourth is shaping up to be the busiest time of the year on the water for the nation’s recreational boaters, with boating traffic potentially surpassing last year’s levels. This also means boaters will face additional safety concerns with waterway congestion and nighttime operation.

In a recent survey of more than a half million BoatUS members, 88 percent of respondents say they are “very-to-extremely likely” to go boating during the 2017 July Fourth holiday period (June 30 through July 9). That compares to 73 percent who went boating over the similar period last year.

4th of July Boating FireworksThe BoatUS member survey also shows that about one in three (36 percent) of respondents are “very-to-extremely likely” to operate a boat at night to view a July Fourth fireworks display from the water. Three percent said that fireworks displays are the only reason they will venture out after dark all year long.

“With nearly 12 million registered boats on the water, boaters will need to take special safety precautions during the holiday period,” said BoatUS Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean Water President Chris Edmonston. The Foundation is the nonprofit safety arm of BoatUS. “The mayhem of fireworks shows, overburdened launch ramps, crowded waterways and long days spent under the stressors of wind, waves and sun will require everyone to up their safety game and be courteous to fellow boaters.”

The BoatUS Foundation has these eight holiday boating tips:

  1. Wait to celebrate with alcohol. It could be a long day on the water, but waiting until after you’ve returned to homeport for the night before celebrating with alcohol is a wise move. Added to the effects of sun, wind and waves, alcohol lowers situational awareness and increases reaction times.
  2. The more lookouts at night, the better. Having extra sets of eyes – family members or guests – can help prevent accidents.

  3. Go slow after the fireworks. After viewing fireworks from the water and pulling up anchor, you may have the urge to rush home. Don’t. Slow down. Be cautious, and the odds for a safe return increase.
  4. Get kids’ life jackets for free. Everyone has extra guests this time of year, but they don’t always have properly-sized life jackets for everyone on board. The BoatUS Foundation’s free Kids Life Jacket Loaner program gives boaters a chance to borrow child-size life jackets for the day, afternoon, or weekend.
  5. Don’t overload the boat. Everyone should have a seat inside the boat, and be careful about adding extra coolers and gear. It’s also a bad idea to allow to passengers to ride on the top of a boat with an enclosed bow while underway.
  6. Be a safe paddler. Kayak, canoe or stand-up paddlers should understand all of the nautical rules of the road, practice defensive paddling and assume no one can see you. At night, paddlers are required to show a white light – colored glow sticks around the paddler’s neck don’t cut it. Avoid crowded anchorages and congested ramp areas.
  7. Never swim near a dock with electricity or in a marina or yacht club.
  8. Avoid the two biggest hassles. The nationwide TowBoatUS on-water towing fleet traditionally reports hundreds of battery jumps and anchor-line disentanglements over the holiday. To avoid having to contact BoatUS 24-hour dispatch (BoatUS.com/app) monitor your battery drain, go slow while hauling anchor line, and be super vigilant so you don’t run over someone else’s anchor line after the show ends.

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Owls Head Trail Closed on Weekends

June 9th, 2017 · No Comments · Adirondack News

Effective immediately the trail to the summit of Owls Head in the town of Keene in the Adirondacks is closed to public access and use on weekends.

Owls Head Trail SignageThe trailhead and all but the last 0.1 mile of the trail are located on private lands. The large number of vehicles parked on the private road during the Memorial Day weekend blocked access for private landowners, and now the landowners are prohibiting the public to park on the private road between 4 p.m. Friday and 7 a.m. Monday and have posted signs along the road reflecting this decision.

The trail to the summit of Owls Head is not an official DEC trail nor does DEC have an easement for public use on the trail – the landowner has allowed the public to use the trail. However, the landowner has informed DEC the trail will be closed for public use at the end of this hiking season.

DEC is in the process of identifying an alternate trail route on Forest Preserve lands from the Molly Nye Road on the opposite side of the mountain, and will pursue an amendment to the High Peaks Wilderness Unit Management Plan which would be necessary to facilitate construction of a new trailhead and trail.

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Snow in the Adirondacks This Weekend

October 21st, 2016 · No Comments · Adirondack News

NYSDEC LogoWEEKEND SNOW FORECAST: Weather forecasts vary but some weather services forecast accumulations of snow ranging from three inches to a foot this weekend throughout most of the Adirondacks.

  • The deepest snows are forecast for the Northwestern Adirondacks and the High Peaks region.
  • Moderate to deeper snow depths are forecast for the Western, Central (West & East), Northern and Northeastern Adirondacks.
  • Little to no snow is forecast for the Eastern and Southern Adirondacks.
  • Snow depths will be deeper in higher elevations.
  • Hikers should plan and prepare accordingly.




Rain, Snow, and Wind: Significant amounts of rain are forecast through the weekend with rain mixing with snow before changing to all snow as described above. Winds will get stronger through the weekend. Check the current National Weather Service Weather Forecast (leaves DEC website) and the National Weather Service NERFC Snow Page (leaves DEC website) for the latest snow information.
Snow Adirondack High Peaks

High Elevation Summits: Temperatures will be colder, winds will be stronger, and snow will be present and deeper than depths at trailheads on summits. Sight distance will be limited, sometimes significantly, when clouds cover the summits. Check the Mountain Point Forecasts (leaves DEC website) for selected summitsNational Weather Service Mountain Point Forecasts.

Trail Conditions: Trails will be wet and muddy through midday Saturday and then become a mix of water, mud, ice, and snow before becoming snow covered as described above.

  • Wet leaves, snow and ice will make for slippery trails – wear proper footwear and traction devices.
  • Snowshoes will be warranted late Saturday and on Sunday in the areas forecast to have moderate to deep snow cover, and in higher elevations.
  • Remain on trails. Walk through mud & water and on snow & ice to prevent further eroding trails and damaging trailside vegetation.

Avoid Hypothermia: The forecasted wet and cold weather provides ideal conditions for hypothermia.

  • Wear waterproof outer layers.
  • Wear layers of fleece, wool, and other non-cotton clothing.
  • Pack extra clothing including a fleece, wool or other non-cotton jacket or sweater.
  • Add or remove layers to maintain a comfortable body temperature.
  • Wear cold weather hat and gloves (or mittens).
  • Eat, drink and rest often.

Shorter Days: Autumn has arrived the sun sets earlier each day.

  • Sunset is around 6:00 pm, earlier in deep valleys and on northern and eastern facing slopes.
  • It will become darker sooner when skies are cloud covered.
  • Plan to return to the trailhead by sunset but
  • always carry a flashlight or headlamp just in case.

Blowdown: Blowdown (fallen or hanging trees, limbs, and branches) may be present on trails as winds strengthen, especially on trails in the higher elevations.

Courtesy of New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

More info at Adirondack Snow Conditions and Resources

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Bienvenue a nos Visiteurs Canadiens

June 24th, 2016 · 1 Comment · Adirondack News

Nous accueillons chaleureusement nos visiteurs canadiens qui passent la Fête de la Saint-Jean-Baptiste à s’amuser dans les régions sauvages des Adirondacks. Nous vous offrons les informations suivantes pour vous assurer un séjour agréable et sûr pendant vos excursions de camping, de randonnée, de pagayer et de bateau. Pour de plus amples renseignements, consultez Adirondack Backcountry Information.

RISQUE DE FEU: MODÉRÉ. Ne jamais laisser un feu sans surveillance. Éteindre complètement le feu. Le bois, les cendres, et les charbons doivent être froids avant de les quitter.

TERRAINS DE CAMPING: Tous les terrains de camping DEC sont ouverts.

RAMPES DE MISE A L’EAU: Toutes les rampes DEC sont ouvertes.

VOIES D’ACCES: Les voies d’accès dans les régions sauvages sont souvent très rugueuses. Un véhicule 4X4 est recommandé.

ÉTAT DES SENTIERS: Les sentiers puissent être mouillés ou boueux au bord de l’eau et aux basses-terres. Les guêtres et les chaussures imperméables sont conseillées. Rester sur les sentiers; m archer à travers la boue et l’eau afin de ne pas endommager la végétation autour des sentiers.

AVIS DE TEMPS CHAUD: Pour se préparer pour les températures élevées, porter des vêtements pas serrés et pas en coton, emporter et boire beaucoup d’eau, porter des lunettes de soleil, un chapeau de soleil, et de la crème solaire.

SÉCURITÉ PENDANT LES ORAGES: Éviter les sommets et les espaces ouverts; quitter les étendues de l’eau. Au premier son du tonnerre, chercher immédiatement un abri dans un endroit bas et loin des arbres très grands. S’accroupir près des arbres plus petits mais loin des troncs des arbres.

NIVEAU DES EAUX: Les niveaux sont généralement moyens ou bas. Les gués sont facilement traversés. Attention: le niveau des eaux dans les bassins d’évacuation et les rivières puisse rapidement s’élever pendant et après les orages.

POUR SE PROTÉGER CONTRE LES PIQURES D’INSECTES: Les mouches noires, les moucherons, les moustiques et les taons sont tous présents dans la forêt et sur les eaux. Pour éviter les piqûres, il est suggéré de:

  • Porter des vêtements de couleur pâle.
  • Porter un pantalon et une chemise à manches longues; rentrer la chemise dans le pantalon.
  • Fermer les manches au poignet.
  • Rentrer les bas du pantalon dans les chaussettes.
  • Apporter une moustiquaire pour la tête
  • Utiliser un produit contre les insectes qui contient du « DEET » Suivre les consignes.

BOITES RESISTANTS AUX OURS: Les règles du DEC exigent que les campeurs qui passent la nuit dans le Eastern High Peaks Wilderness Area gardent leurs provisions dans une boîte résistante aux ours. En général, tous les campeurs sont conseillés de se servir de ces boîtes partout dans les Adirondacks.

FERMETURES DE VOIES D’ESCALADE (dû à la nidification des faucons pèlerins):

  • Chapel Pond – Toutes les voies sur Lower Washbowl Cliffs
  • Wilmington Notch – Toutes les voies sur Moss Cliff et Labor Day Wall
  • Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain – Toutes les voies d’escalade sur la Main Face sont fermées sauf pour les voies entre et comprenant « Opposition » et « A Womb With A View ».
  • Crane Mountain – Toutes les voies à l’intérieur de Amphitheater sur Black Arches Wall
  • Shelving Rock Mountain, Lake George : Toutes les voies sur Big Wall et Jackass Buttress.
  • Sleeping Beauty Mountain, Lake George – Toutes les voies sont fermées.

Nous vous souhaitons un séjour agréable dans les Adirondacks!

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Fête de la Reine 2016 – Régions sauvages des Adirondacks

May 20th, 2016 · No Comments · Adirondack News

BIENVENUE A NOS VISITEURS CANADIENS

NYSDEC LogoLe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation accueille chaleureusement nos amis canadiens qui passent le week-end de la fête de la Reine à s’amuser dans les régions sauvages des Adirondacks. Nous vous offrons les informations suivantes pour vous assurer un séjour agréable et sûr pendant vos excursions de camping, de randonnée, de pagayer et de bâteau. Pour de plus amples renseignements, consultez Adirondack Backcountry Information


RISQUE DE FEU: modéré (sauf pour la région High Peaks où le risque est faible).

TERRAINS DE CAMPING: Tous les terrains de camping DEC sont ouverts.

VOIES D’ACCES: Les voies d’accès dans les régions sauvages sont souvent très rugueuses. Un véhicule 4X4 est recommandé. La majorité des voies d’accès sont ouvertes. Veuillez consulter le lien au-dessus pour savoir quelles voies/routes sont fermées.

RAMPES DE MISE A L’EAU: Toutes les rampes DEC sont ouvertes et les docks sont installés.

STATIONNEMENT/CAMPING: Le parking aux points de départ aussi bien que les terrains de camping intérieurs dans les régions sauvages des Eastern High Peaks, Dix Mountain et Giant Mountain sont souvent occupés à pleine capacité. Les visiteurs sont donc conseillés de faire des projets convenables (y compris de considérer un séjour dans d’autres régions des Adirondacks).

AVIS DE CONDITIONS BOUEUSES: Afin de protéger la flore et les sentiers qui sont très susceptibles au printemps, les randonneurs sont priés d’éviter les sentiers au-dessus de 2500 pieds de hauteur. La randonnée provoque des érosions très sévères sur les sentiers et endommagent la végétation. Les pistes raides, mouillés et boueuses sont aussi extrêmement glissantes. Pendant cette « saison de boue » les randonneurs sont conseillés de se servir des sentiers aux altitudes plus basses. More: DEC Alerts Hikers of Muddy Trail Conditions in The High Peaks

BOITES RESISTANTS AUX OURS: Les règles du DEC exigent que les campeurs qui passent la nuit dans le Eastern High Peaks Wilderness Area gardent leurs provisions dans une boîte résistante aux ours. En général, tous les campeurs sont conseillés de se servir de ces boîtes partout dans les Adirondacks.

POUR SE PROTÉGER CONTRE LES PIQURES D’INSECTES: Les mouches noires et les moustiques sont présentes. Pour éviter les piqûres, il est suggéré de :

  • Porter des vêtements de couleur pâle.
  • Porter un pantalon et une chemise à manches longues; rentrer la chemise dans le pantalon.
  • Fermer les manches au poignet.
  • Rentrer les bas du pantalon dans les chaussettes.
  • Apporter une moustiquaire pour la tête
    Utiliser un produit contre les insectes qui contient du « DEET »

ÉTAT DES EAUX: Le niveau des eaux est plutôt basse pour le printemps; les températures sont froides. Ceux qui font du kayak, du canöe, et du bâteau sont fortement conseillés de porter constamment un gilet de sauvetage.

FERMETURES DE VOIES D’ESCALADE (dû à la nidification des faucons pèlerins) :

  • Chapel Pond : Toutes les voies sur Lower et Upper Washbowl Cliffs.
  • Wilmington Notch : Toutes les voies sur Moss Cliff et Labor Day Wall.
  • Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain : Toutes les voies d’escalade sur la Main Face sont fermées sauf pour les voies entre et comprenant « Opposition » et « A Womb With A View ».
  • Crane Mountain: Toutes les voies dans Amphitheater sur Black Arches Wall.
  • Shelving Rock Mountain : Toutes les voies sur Big Wall et Jackass Buttress.

Nous vous souhaitons un séjour agréable dans les Adirondacks

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